Includes Standard Clusters:

Use properties of rational and irrational numbers.
• Interpret functions that arise in applications in
terms of a context.
• Analyze functions using different representations.
• Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.
• Build new functions from existing functions.
• Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems.

Collection Contents


Connect N.RN.3 to physical situations, e.g., finding the perimeter of a square of area 2.
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Focus on quadratic functions; compare with linear and exponential functions studied in Unit 2.
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For F.IF.7b, compare and contrast absolute value, step and piecewise defined functions with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Highlight issues of domain, range, and usefulness when examining piecewise defined functions. Note that this unit, and in particular in F.IF.8b, extends the work begun in Unit 2 on exponential functions with integer exponents. For F.IF.9, focus on expanding the types of functions considered to include, linear, exponential, and quadratic. Extend work with quadratics to include the relationship between coefficients and roots, and that once roots are known, a quadratic equation can be factored.
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Focus on situations that exhibit a quadratic relationship.
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For F.BF.3, focus on quadratic functions, and consider including absolute value functions. For F.BF.4a, focus on linear functions but consider simple situations where the domain of the function must be restricted in order for the inverse to exist, such as f = x^2, x>0.
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Compare linear and exponential growth to quadratic growth.
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