Introduction:
 

n this assignment students first go through a prepared Google Earth tour on Juneau Icefield glaciers, and answer questions about glacier features. Then students create their own Google Earth tour, using placemarks to identify key features of their glacier.
 

Group Size: Any
 

Learning Objectives:
 

To have the students make their own observations and identify the consequences of climate change on an alpine glacier, not to just read about it.
 

Guiding Question:
 

Where are current glaciers and what evidence can we find of melting?
 

Materials:
 

Google Earth download http://www.google.com/earth/index.html

Lesson Plan: http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/climatechange/activities/21214.html
 

Procedures:
 

Google Earth Making a Guided Glacier Tour

Open Google Earth. From the PLACES menu on the left of the screen, select “My Places”. In the top toolbar, select ADD, then FOLDER. Type in Google Earth and your last name (ex. Google Earth Pelto). Click OK, you will see the folder appear in the My Places list on the left.

Now you are ready to start your tour. In the SEARCH menu on the left of the screen, choose the “Fly To” tab and type in the name of a location that you would like to start from (ex. Juneau, AK). Click on the magnifying glass to begin your search.

Zoom in or out using the vertical + . . . . . . . . . . . . . – scale on the right of your screen. Move in different directions with the arrows inside the compass. Rotate your view using the compass circle. Change your tilt viewpoint by using the horizontal x . . . . . . . . . . . . – scale on the right of your screen. It is important to use these features in examining your glacier to provide the best angle to both identify and illustrate key characteristics of a glacier.

When you arrive at your first point, click on the pushpin button in the top tool bar – ADD PLACEMARK”. Use your curser to pinpoint the location of your place mark now.

  1. In the name box, type in the name of your location.
2. In the description box, type in some text about your location and why you chose to bring us here. Note: there are more icons available if you would like to customize. Click on the pushpin button to the right of the name box. Click OK and your place mark will appear in your folder to the left. As you add more place marks, you can rearrange them in any order by clicking and dragging them up or down. You can edit the information at each location at any time by right clicking on the place mark on your map, edit properties

3. Add an image to further enhance your place mark. Find an image on the web. Right click on the image, and choose PROPERTIES from the menu. Copy the URL Address of the image. http://www.nichols.edu/departments/Glacier/2006flash/eastont06%20copy.jpg In the text box, type in . Paste the URL of the image between the “” marks. Example: http://www.nichols.edu/departments/Glacier/2006flash/eastont06%20copy.jpg”>

You must include at least 10 different locations in your tour. Focus on key features of the glacier such as the snowline, lakes on or at the terminus of the glacier, streams on the glacier surface, trimlines, freshly deglaciated areas, icefalls. Each location is worth 5 points for the place mark, 3 points for the description, and 2 points for the visual image. Search for information on your glacier online.

When you are ready to save, right click on your folder, choose SAVE AS and save it to your folder.
 

Assessment:
 

Determining whether students have met the goals 1) That technically they put together the Google Earth file correctly 2) I examine the accuracy of their interpretation. 3) I determine the level of insight that their placemarks offer.
 

Answer Key or Rubric:
 

Determining whether students have met the goals 1) That technically they put together the Google Earth file correctly 2) I examine the accuracy of their interpretation. 3) I determine the level of insight that their placemarks offer.
 

Benchmark or Standards:
 

E1.1C Conduct scientific investigations using appropriate tools and techniques.

E5.4D: Based on evidence of observable changes in recent history and climate change models, explain the consequences of warmer oceans and changing climatic zones.

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