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Apply the Addition Rule, P(A or B)=P(A)+P(B)?P(A and B), and interpret the answer in terms of the model.Exercises from Illustrative MathematicsA set of 3 exercises, commentary, and solutions
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Students use the addition rule to calculate the probability of a union of two events.Students interpret probabilities in context.Teacher and Student versions of full lesson from engageNY
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Mutually Inclusive Events Here you will learn how to calculate the probability that any one of multiple events will occur, even though two or more of them could happen at the same time.Lesson, videos, exercises, and text from CK-12. Additional resources available at this site.
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Mutually Inclusive EventsSuppose you're selecting a card from a deck of cards with your eyes closed. What is the probability that you'll select a red card or a Queen? Is this a mutually exclusive event or a mutually inclusive event? Can you explain your answer?Lesson, videos, exercises, and text from CK-12. Additional resources available at this site.
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Additive and Multiplicative Rules for ProbabilityIn this Concept, you will learn how to combine probabilities with the Additive Rule and the Multiplicative Rule. Through the examples in this lesson, it will become clear when to use which rule. You will also be presented with information about mutually exclusive events and independent events.Lessons, videos, exercises, and text from CK-12. Additional resources available at this site.
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