During Step 3, students organize the information they gathered to make it meaningful and persuasive to readers. After selecting their most powerful evidence to deepen their arguments, they identify the “other side” of the argument and best approach to countering it. By the end of this step, students should have outlined the body of a convincing editorial.


Students analyze a mentor text to see the structure of an editorial. They then begin to organize their own editorials by matching evidence to their supporting arguments.
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Students learn the importance of selecting evidence that will be persuasive to their audience and apply this knowledge to their own pieces of writing. As part of this process, students add to their arguments, as appropriate, and eliminate evidence that does not help them make a convincing case.
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Students review their classmates’ responses to Share Your Opinion (from Step 1) as a starting point in determining the “other side’s” position on their topic. Using these data, students identify one argument from the other side that is likely to sway their audience and develop a counterargument supported with evidence.

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This supplementary lesson is targeted to classrooms in which students are inexperienced in using word processing software. Students learn about good file saving practices in preparation for typing their first drafts. Students learn to upload their typed documents to the Online Classroom.
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Animation: Plan Your Editorial

by Teaching Matters
Animated short on planning your editorial.
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Animated short on countering the other side with your editorial evidence.
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Students use this packet to plan the structure of their editorials.
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Visuals for step 3 of Writing Editorials.
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