TABLE OF CONTENTS

Understanding By Design

Social Studies Understanding by Design Lesson Plans

Social Studies lesson plans using Understanding by Design from Trinity University.

Collection Contents

Where I Live

by Lani deGuia

By Melissa ColeStudents will understand that people use maps and map features to identify specific landforms, landmarks and areas of significance in their local and national communities. Students will know how to use and create maps that contain specific map features, (titles, orientation, and legend/key) will be able to identify, label and place landforms correctly on maps and will be able to identify and describe local and national places of significance. Students will independently use their learning to create, identify and interpret maps of their local environments, communities and state.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Ellie ChernoskyThe goal of this unit is for students to understand what a “classical culture” is and why history remembers the West. Students will begin by learning about Greece and Rome, focusing on the modern legacies of these two classical civilizations. They will begin by distinguishing between early river valley civilizations and classical civilizations and analyzing the changes and continuities. Students will compare political systems, and then, they will analyze the influence of Greek democracy on America’s political system. Students will review the main legacies of Rome, and learn about the rise and fall of Rome by completing a model. After studying about Greece and Rome, students will be able to make connections between classical civilizations and how they affect us today.The performance task requires students to research a classical civilization in India, Persia, Mesoamerica, and China. They will represent that civilization and prove why their civilization is both “advanced” and “classical” by participating in a forum. Each group will prove their civilization’s importance to a panel of judges. The goal is for students to understand that classical civilizations arose around the world, and Western dominance does not negate the achievements of societies in other regions. Students will reflect on the question, “What would be lost without the existence of this classical society?”These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Physical Geography

by Lani deGuia

This unit is designed to give 9th grade World Geography students a foundational understanding of physical geography, then have the students apply that knowledge to explore the essential questions: “How does the physical world shape societies?” and “In what ways does the physical geography of a region limit or enhance a society?”. Students will investigate physical features, extreme weather, the four spheres, climate zones, and climate regions to understand the diversity of the earth’s geography. This unit will culminate in students creating their own society based on the assignment of random physical features, latitude, and extreme weather. For this summative assessment, students must apply their knowledge to evaluate their imagined society’s relationship to the landscape they inhabit.Repository CitationHarrington, Meghan and Anderson, Kyle, "Physical Geography" (2014). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 287.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/287Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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By Carly DoddWhile studying Latin America in the 20th century, post WWII, students will be looking at the economic policies many countries in Latin America implement in order to industrialize and modernize; and that unlike earlier western countries, the governments often take a much stronger and intrusive role. Students will then be comparing these effects of the first wave of modernization with the effects of current change happening in Brazil, due to their hosting of the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics. Students will obtain the foundation for the information through reading and interactive notes (interactive means that there is continuous analysis during notes of primary sources—charts, maps, timelines; and discussion on historical causation). After learning major economic policies and the government’s role, using post WWII Brazil as the case study, students will complete a performance task using a text-based Microlab protocol. The text is an article which focuses on the policies of that the Brazilian government has implemented in order to host their international events, and the economic and social unrest these policies have created. Through the analysis of the Microlab, students will then answer an A.P. formatted writing prompt, which asks them to compare economic development and the government’s role in that process between post WWII Brazil and the as they prepare to host the 2014 World Cup.
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By Tina HarperHelping students understand the connection between culture and mythology is the central focus of this unit. Humanities is a course where the ideas, skills, and content of both history and English weave together to form the curriculum. In this unit the content focuses on Greek mythology and the Native Tribes of Texas.The skills students will develop and transfer include: note taking skills, finding the main ideas in both history and literature to define aspects of culture, the writing process, the format of an effective story/myth using plot structure, the behaviors needed to function as an effective group. Also included in the unit is the process needed to create an effective essay to include a thesis, body paragraphs containing evidence to prove a thesis, and a concluding paragraph with an explanation as to how the ideas discussed in the essay are significant beyond the content discussed/argued.The unit will culminate with students writing a myth that follows the structures of an effective story/mythThese works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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B M. Melendy JacobieA unit for the first time period of AP World History. Students explore the essential questions of “What do we know about ancient societies? How do we know it? How does the geography of a place impact human activity? What characteristics must a civilization possess?” Students will explore the Paleolithic Era by examining the Lascaux Caves and the modern “Paleo” diet. They will track the changes brought by the Neolithic Revolution and discuss the qualities of a civilization before completing a performance task in which they research and create a video about one of the six core/foundational civilizations.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By John Laymon IIIThis unit was designed to cover the new STAAR TEKS for U.S History including the “Celebrate Freedom Week” TEKS and the Introductory TEKS for U.S History. By covering these TEKS at the start of the year students can get a refresh from 8th grade History, if they still remember 8th grade U.S History. By front loading these TEKS early on instead of reviewing these TEKS before STAAR testing, students will have more time to review Colonial America, the American Revolution, our founding documents. This unit will provide a foundation for the rest of the year allowing U.S History to be taught in a chronological order instead of skipping our founding documents, the American Revolution, and quickly reviewing those later in the year. By understanding the formation of our nation and its founding documents students will be able to understand the role the individuals play in our constitutional republic and how historical events developed as a result of or in correlation with the apparatus of our society these founding documents have created.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Mark A. McCullough
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By Hillary RodriguezThis unit covers the major transformations in Europe from the 15th century to the 18th century. The unit includes the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment. After background information is provided to students via flipped instruction videos, students will examine each of the four movements in detail during class time through the stories of important “thinkers” associated with each movement. At the end of the unit, students will create a presentation which shows the impact of an assigned thinker from one of the movements on the world today. The essential questions:Can one person have a significant impact on history?When should one break with tradition?How do new ideas change the world?Will be continuously discussed and the answers refined throughout the unit. Through the study of this unit, students will not only have a clear understanding of the causes and events of these four major units, but they will also understand that individuals can have an impact on history, the decision to break with tradition varies according to circumstances, and there are some ideas that are truly revolutionary and that can continue to influence the world.CommentsIncludes flipped instruction videosThese works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Adele BarnettWhile studying the region of Australia, students will study differing perspectives on its economic development and efforts to protect its environment. Students will adopt roles of different Australian citizens and conduct research in order to draw conclusions about how people as different as coal mine owners and marine biologists would feel about economic and environmental issues. After learning about these crucial contemporary issues and dilemmas that face the country, students will complete a performance task of writing a persuasive letter or speech advocating for a specific position of course of action that will promote the best possible future or Australia and its people.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Kari MatthiesThis unit was written as an in-depth look at classical cultures and their far-reaching impacts. It will specifically consider the impact of classical culture on modern-day American society. The difference between written and unwritten history, along with variances between the two, will also be considered. Students will look at written history, and maps to understand the major political, philosophical, and cultural influences of Ancient Greece and Rome. They will discover the fundamental ideas and institutions of Western civilizations that originated in Greece and Rome with the purpose of understanding their own society better. The unit will culminate with a project that allows for in-depth discussion and analysis of these two important ancient cultures; the project also requires comparing and contrasting ancient culture with modern-day American society.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Becky Orsini and Nick ThomasonThis unit was written as an in-depth look at the Civil War and Reconstruction. It is an attempt to provide enduring understandings of the changes that took place in the United States, specifically in the southern states, due to the impact of the Civil War and the provisions of Reconstruction. During the unit, students will have several opportunities to look at how changes have occurred in the past that influence them today. Students will do a self-examination of the changes that have taken place in their own lives and apply those understandings to the lessons of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Students will use their understanding of how the war impacted lives throughout the United States and the Confederacy to complete their performance task. The performance task will ask students to create a Civil War era care package for a soldier in the Union Army. Their understanding of how even little actions can bring about change will be put to the test as they are asked to fill their care package with a few items that may turn the tide of the war in favor of the Union.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Myself and Others

by Lani deGuia

By Anne PeppersThis unit addresses the Texas Pre-Kindergarten Guideline “Child identifies similarities and differences in characteristics of people.” At the conclusion of this unit, students will know that people are different from one another, people share some characteristics, personal characteristics can be physical or behavioral, and we can describe or name characteristics of people. Students will be able to identify similarities and differences between self and others, identify physical similarities and differences between others, and identify unique characteristics about themselves.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Texas Regions

by Lani deGuia

By Hannah RinnThis is a unit on Texas Regions written for fourth graders. The unit covers the four Texas regions. While learning about the Texas regions, students will gain an understanding that regions are formed based on common characteristics that influence the human environment. Students will also be required to look at how technology has impacted the land that we live on. This unit helps students to think critically about- what is a region and how it is “formed” and how technology has changed our land.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Explorers

by Lani deGuia

By Carrie Sites and Melissa Cole Students will understand that people explore and settle or different purposes including riches, land, and the spread of religion. Students will also know the history or background of explorers and how that defines the cultures of Texas. At the end of this unit students will independently demonstrate their learning by summarizing an explorer’s accomplishments and reasons for exploring by creating and interacting with a Fakebook page.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Stephany Weaver and Anne Daly“Culture and Identity in your Community and the World” is an interdisciplinary unit designed to stimulate questions about identity and culture and how those two things relate. This unit is meant to be taught at the end of the first semester and the beginning of the second semester. Students have already established an understanding of literary elements in fiction and will now be searching for those same engaging elements in non-fiction.As the students read the memoir Red Scarf Girl by Ji-li Jiang in Reading, they will be studying the effects of culture and community on a single person’s identity in Non-Fiction Studies, a writing and social studies class. Students will learn the skills to analyze non-fiction and elaborate on their application of the writing process, as well. The unit will culminate in a an exhibition of the students’ culture. Students will create an exhibit within our very own Institute of KIPPster Cultures. Students will model their exhibit after exhibits in the Institute of Texan Cultures, which they will have previously visited. We will turn our gym into the Institute and students will set up their exhibits around the gym during our sixth grade report card night. Parents, siblings, administrators, community members, and the press will be invited to view the Institute. Students’ exhibits should represent their identity, community (school, neighborhood, and/or San Antonio), culture, and at least one connection made with other individuals, communities, or cultures around the world.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Bethany LorgeThis unit is designed to look at various cultures throughout the world and examine the reason for conflict in each of them. By looking at snapshots of information for various cultures and situations (e.g. Africa, Israel/Palestine, India/Pakistan, North/South Korea), students come to the understanding that conflict is due to many factors, but there is always a matter of different perspective for each situation. The students look at the history of each situation from a factual standpoint, but they also are stretched to investigate and explore the perspectives of each as well. The students’ performance task has them creating a news show that interviews representatives of each side of the conflict as well as a “scholar” on the situation who has developed a solution to bring peace to the area.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Mitzi MooreA summer assignment asks students to read the book Bamboo People, by Mitali Perkins, and complete assignments in every class that are connected to the book. At the beginning of the school year, teachers use the assignments to extend the learning and help students understand the major themes of the book (child soldiers, landmines, literacy, and service to others). A video conference with the author is planned, as well as interactions with people familiar with modern-day Myanmar/Burma. The culminating activity is to bring all the assignments together in one place by publishing a blog post.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Mitzi Moore and Kathleen PedderThis unit asks freshmen to verbally advocate for an assigned policy option from an assigned roll, during a simulation in which they work in teams to influence a mock Presidential Advisory Panel on Environmental Issues. Learning the content (global environmental problems), researching, and collaborating to establish a position will take one month and be taught primarily through Biology and World Geography classes, with support from Math and Multimedia. They will also read Ishmael in English class, and extend their understanding of sustainability issues by taking a week-long field trip immediately following the simulation.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Karen Morrison‘It’s a Small World After All: An Economic Experiment in Trade’ is a social studies unit for 3rd grade with an emphasis on economics. Aligned with 3rd grade social studies TEKS, student gain a rich understanding of scarcity, free market, and interdependence within and among communities. This unit utilizes a variety of resources including: Scott Foresman’s Social Studies: Communities Basal Reader, various real-life application internet activities and journal writing reflection opportunities. Students will have several formative assessments to track understanding throughout the unit. The culminating project-based assessment invites students to engage in a free trade simulation. With the guidance of the CIA Factbook website, students will represent countries and pretend they are restaurant owners creatively making food for a menu. The trade opportunity happens when students communicate and negotiate with one another to obtain the necessary ingredients for their entrées, appetizers, and desserts— a real-world application to understanding our world’s economic system.
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Our Families

by Lani deGuia

By Beth Morrow and Anne PeppersThis unit addresses the Texas Pre-Kindergarten Guideline “Child identifies similarities and differences in characteristics of families.” At the conclusion of this unit, students will know what a family is, that families can be different, and that changes occur in families and will be able to identify differences between families, identify similarities between families, and identify members of their own families.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Becky Orsini and Nick ThomasonThis unit was written as an in-depth explanation of the Texas and US Constitutions. It is an attempt to provide enduring understandings of the purpose behind the Texas and US Constitutions and why laws are important to keep a society functioning effectively. Students will be able to understand the relationship between civil liberties, state government powers, and federal government powers. They will see how the various parts of the constitution (Preamble, Articles, and Bill of Rights) work together to create a document that allows the government to work for the people while protecting them at the same time. In the end, the students will assimilate their knowledge of the six basic principles of the Constitution (popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, and judicial review) into a project that requires them to create a their own constitution as a system of government to be adopted by their school.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Susanna PierceThis capstone unit in an AP Macroeconomics course pushes students to critically apply the economic skills gained from the semester into practice. As representatives of an NGO, students create a proposal for the World Bank that demonstrates why their development project will stimulate economic growth in their assigned region of the world; ultimately, students will strive to convince the members to subsidize the implementation of this specific project.In the four-week unit, students will discover the strategies of economic development. First, they will be exposed to shocking statistics and economic indicators that reveal the gravity of poverty worldwide. These numbers will help explain the pivotal role the developed world has in uniting to combat against global hunger. Next, economic case studies will teach them how investments in human and/or physical capital facilitate economic development. As they analyze the societal, economical, and political benefits of specific projects aimed at improving healthcare, education, agricultural production, infrastructure, and the environment, they will see the purpose of non-governmental agencies. Ultimately, the readings, investigations, country case studies, and structured discussions will equip the students with the skills to address the barriers that hinder economic development in the developing world. In effect, students will see their roles as Global Leaders to advocate for global cooperation in the upcoming generation.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Ancient Egypt

by Lani deGuia

By Jeanine CapitaniThis unit on Ancient Egypt is one of five units I teach about ancient civilizations after completing a study of what culture is and how it defines us. This unit focuses on the geography, religion, and social structures of ancient Egypt. It also emphasizes an understanding of the different time periods of Egyptian society from 4,500 BC- the 18th Dynasty. At the end of this unit on Egypt, the students will demonstrate knowledge of the culture of Egypt by writing and illustrating a story where they go back in time and describe two aspects of Egyptian culture as well as meet a person and describe their place in the social hierarchy.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Citizenship

by Lani deGuia

By Christy CusterThis unit is designed to be taught within the first few months of second grade. In this unit students learn the qualities of a good citizen. Through examples from literature, history, and daily life, students learn what it means to be a good citizen. They can then apply these good citizen traits such as respect, honesty, kindness, self-discipline, responsibility, and fairness to their role as citizens of a school. At the end of the unit students will be able to identify these good citizen traits and apply them to the classroomand school community. For the final project students will inform parents about a new citizenship committee at the school and also nominate another student to be citizen of the month. This unit is the building block for later units that will focus on what it looks like to be a good citizen of a community and of a country, specifically the United States.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Laura Eberle and Hannah Rinn This is a unit on the Middle Ages written for fourth graders in a Core Knowledge school. The unit covers the time period from the Fall of Rome to the Black Death and the end of the feudal system. While learning about this transitional time in history, students will gain an understanding that societies grow and evolve over time, adapting to circumstances and advances that arise. Key figures during the Middle Ages will be introduced, such as Charlemagne, Henry II, Eleanor of Aquitaine, and William the Conqueror. Through these examples, students will also begin to understand that the ideas and beliefs that people profess affect their behavior.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Bethany Lorge and Linda O’Connor The goal of this unit is for students to understand the cultures and conflicts that result from these cultures in the Middle East. Students will begin by learning about the geography of this region of the world through various mapping activities. They will begin to learn how the culture of this region is influenced by its geography and climate. Students will be able to explain how the predominance of Christianity, Judaism and Islam has led to conflicts in this region of the world. Students will also learn about the major impact that oil has had in the Middle East and how its discovery has led not only to economic growth but challenges as well.The performance task “Who’s Coming to Dinner” will provide a means for students to demonstrate their understanding of the unit by planning a dinner party that will include people from this region that represent different religions and cultures. In groups, customary food, clothing, and cultural traits will be portrayed through art, drama, and writing in preparing for this “dinner party”. Individually, students will also write an announcement for the school news program that airs daily, explaining what their experience was like from the perspective of an American student who’s returned back from this dinner party. Similarities and differences between the cultures as well as likes and dislikes of the region will be included in the report.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Becky Orsini and Nick ThomasonThis interdisciplinary unit focuses on the institution of slavery and the many forms in which it manifests. Students will be challenged to look at slavery in all of its forms and determine its impact on the lives of those who experienced it. In Texas History the students will look at the political, social and economic factors that caused slavery to be a dominate force in the growth of Texas. In ELA, students will look at slavery from the point of view of a former slave as they read the historical-fiction novel, “Spartacus”, by Lewis Grassic Gibbon. For their Performance Task, students will research the forms that slavery takes in the modern world. To extend the exercise, students will attempt to find ways that they can bring about change in the conditions of those who are suffering from these contemporary forms of slavery. Students will understand that while all people are created equal; not all people are treated equally. Additionally, students will walk away from this unit understanding that history is a story, and who tells the story affects how it is perceived.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Robert Stafford Students will focus on levels of development in Africa and investigate why many parts of Africa are underdeveloped. Students will examine how physical geography impacts development, the effects of European colonization on African development, and contemporary issues (famine, conflicts, diseases, and political instability/corruption) that hinder development.Students will then use this information to compare levels of development in African countries, explain why the developmental levels vary, and develop strategies to encourage development in struggling countries.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Samuel DeJohnThis unit was constructed as an introduction to 12th grade US Government. It is an attempt to provide enduring understandings of the United States Constitution and how it compares with other forms of government. There are many options of governing systems, but through an evolutionary process, the United States Constitution contains sound principles which allowed a republic endure through regional infighting, civil unrest, and infinite political reforms. The unit begins with taxonomy of various governing systems and ideas. After the classification process, students will look at how regional politics play into nation building. While reflecting on the Constitutional Convention and the context in which it was created, students will begin to weigh the relationship between civil liberties, state government powers, and federal government powers. In the end, the students will process their knowledge of the six basic principles of the Constitution (popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, and judicial review) nto a holistic project that requires them to find how profound and relevant the principles re to America’s 200+ year success.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Carly DoddThis unit outlines U.S. expansion and imperialism at the turn of the 19th century, a policy change from America's traditional stance of isolationism. The content covers newly acquired U.S. territories, the Spanish-American War, changing U.S. foreign policy through Theodore Roosevelt and John Jay, as well as the historical debate of the time period: the growth of anti-imperialists. The unit uses secondary and primary sources, coopertive learning methods, and an emphasis on vocabulary to not only allow students depth in learning, but also a foundation with which to be successful for TAKS. The unit's two essential questions ask students to explore the deeper motivations and stipulations of imperialism, while connecting it to the modern day issue of U.S. involvement in Iraq. The unit is estimated to take eleven 90 minute block class periods, however it can easily be manipulated for a lesser time block. The unit aligns with NEISD scope and sequence as well as the standards outlined in the TEKS.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Africa

by Lani deGuia

By Kate EmpsonStudents will focus on colonialism in Africa. The focus will be on natural resources and the geographic location of Africa and how these two factors led to European colonization of Africa. The unit will then move on to explain how the colonization and exploitation of Africa led to the cycle of poverty in which Africa is currently embedded. Students will use their knowledge of Africa to participate in a simulation. Students will be assigned a specific country in Africa to research. Students will also research the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and determine how these goals have affected Africa.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Viva La Mexico

by Lani deGuia

By Beth FittsTraditions are time-honored practices that are passed down from one generation to the next. Where you live influences your traditions. People, places, institutions and countries can be independent. Mexico in now independent. Native American and Spanish legacies contribute to Mexico's vibrant culture.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Supply and Demand

by Lani deGuia

By Matthew Shane FittsInteraction of Supply and Demandin a free-market economy, price is a function of supply and demand. In most cases, competitive markets send resources to the uses in which they have the highest value. Elasticity is the measure of the responsiveness to changes in prices.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By  Jessica Waltman The goal of this unit is to introduce students to the Middle East region of the world. Through the themes of the resources of oil and water students will gain a deeper understanding of the conflicts that have plagued this region of the world. Students will focus on the essential questions "What creates allies and enemies?", "Why is there conflict?", and "Are humans the heroes or villains of the earth?" in order to better understand the perspectives towards and of this part of the world. The activities and daily lessons of this unit are built to aid students in their understanding of the use and conservation of water and oil within the Middle East, where oil and water reserves are located, and how the location benefits certain populations and creates conflicts for others. The unit will end with a focus on the current conflict between Palestine and Israel. Students will organize a "dinner party" of perspectives on the conflict and create questions to guide the conversations of the guests to help them see the different opinions concerning resources and religion within this region.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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By Kate EmpsonIn this unit students will learn about the events that culminated in the beginning of the Texas Revolution. Students will study specific legislative acts by the Mexican government and discover how these acts, which placed restrictions on activity in Texas, pushed many Texans to rebellion. They will then analyze these events and try to understand how historical figures in both Mexico and Texas would have viewed these legislative acts. The final performance assessment will require students to study a current conflict and the events that led up to that conflict. Students must then decide which side they would support in the conflict.These works are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
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Economics

by Lani deGuia

Mahler, Jennifer, "Economics" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 55.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/55Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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In this unit students will be focusing on the American society during the Gilded Age. Students will understand the rise of the Gilded Age through invention and technology. Students will see how progress includes opportunities and challenges and the relationship between technology and economic development. Students will be able to see the interdependence between environment and migration due to technological and economic development. During this unit students will also analyze the growth of business, labor unrest, immigration and social inequalities that are inevitable in human societies. The culminating performance assessment allows students to explore the complexities of society during this period.Repository CitationMcHenry, Caesie, "All That Glitters is not Gold (Gilded Age)" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 53.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/53Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Aztec, Inca, and Maya

by Lani deGuia

Students will understand that… -geographical factors influence civilizations through environment, economy, growth, and communication. - -civilizations have a rise and fall -understand civilization as a system.Repository CitationTrinity University and Canyon Ridge Elementary School (San Antonio, Tex.), "Aztec, Inca, and Maya" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 58.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/58Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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China (Civilizations)

by Lani deGuia

Students will understand that… • The Ancient Chinese Civilization left a legacy.Repository CitationTrinity University and Canyon Ridge Elementary School (San Antonio, Tex.), "China (Civilizations)" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 57.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/57Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Students will understand that… • Civilizations’ governments, religion, geography, and theatre affect their development. • The Greek Civilization left a legacy.Repository CitationTrinity University and Canyon Ridge Elementary School (San Antonio, Tex.), "Greece (Civilizations)" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 40.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/40Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Maps and Globes

by Lani deGuia

Students will understand that… A map is a representation or drawing of a place. A globe is a three dimensional model of the earth. Any place can be depicted on a map. Features of land and water are shown on maps and globes. Maps and globes are smaller representations of places.Repository CitationTrinity University and Canyon Ridge Elementary School (San Antonio, Tex.), "Maps and Globes" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 46.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/46Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Trinity University and Canyon Ridge Elementary School (San Antonio, Tex.), "Traders and Raiders : A Learning Journey through Time" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 48.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/48Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Themes of Geography

by Lani deGuia

Throughout this unit students will be introduced to the five themes of geography. These themes will be brought up in future units of study to help students better organize their understandings and perceptions of the world around them. In understanding the themes of Location, Place, Region, Movement, and Human-Environment Interaction, students will be prepared to answer the essential question of “Why is the where important?” The activities and lessons of this unit are built to aid students in their understanding of how humans interact with one another and their environments and to begin to see the differences and similarities of the world around them. Students will make these discoveries through the study of local, national, and international geography. The performance assessment is designed to give students a structure for understanding how the themes of geography can help them better define the world and how humans have impacted it.Repository CitationWaltman, Jessica, "Themes of Geography" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 62.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/62Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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U.S. Constitution

by Lani deGuia

In this unit, students will explore the U.S. Constitution. They will begin by analyzing the issues and debates of the colonial era that brought about the need for a more structured centralized government. They will then study the processes of creation and ratification, and examine how these processes have contributed to the documents longevity and success. They will further that examination by evaluating the actual words of the document. The culminating performance assessment will require students to create their own constitutional plan for the governance of their history classroom. They will present their plans to the class and examine the strengths and weaknesses of each plan. They will compare their classroom s constitution to that of the United States and assess whether or not it would be as effectively successful.Repository CitationAltman, Ben, "U. S. Constitution" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 28.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/28Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Latin America

by Lani deGuia

The students will recognize that where we live influences how we live. The students will know what important physical features of Latin America are and how Latin Americans have adapted to these various environments, how physical and human characteristics affect life in Latin America s rural regions, how the people of the Caribbean and Central America are affected by landforms and climate, what economic and environmental challenges the rainforests of Latin America face, how natural resources are utilized, how vertical climate zones affect agriculture, and in which ways Andean cultures have adapted to their physical environment. The students will recognize how the actions of individuals and/or societies can influence others. The students will examine the historical development of Latin America, including the exchange of culture between Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans, the urbanization of Latin America, and the effects of NAFTA on Mexico. The performance assessment is designed to give students a chance to examine how a specific individual was influenced by where he or she lived, and how he or she has influenced Latin America and the United States. Through it, students should examine the physical and social environment of a specific Latin American country and consider how people are influenced by their environment and by others.Repository CitationAnderson, Ruth, "Latin America" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 22.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/22Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Holocaust

by Lani deGuia

In this unit students will read Night by Elie Wiesel as a means for discovering the atrocities of the Holocaust. Our study will provide them with the opportunity to uncover the following understandings: prejudice generates powerful feelings which can lead to violent consequences and human suffering, suffering produces significant change in humans, and effective communication of the change in an individual can promote the growth of human society. As students read the nonfiction book and conduct research on the historical events surrounding the Holocaust they will answer the questions why does different matter? and can hope and despair coexist? Through a study of atrocities recently committed which have caused significant human suffering, students will explore the question is it ever right to do the wrong thing? The unit will conclude with a project which will allow students to apply what they have learned. After our study of current events which have been compared to the Holocaust, students will have the freedom to create a product which applies their understanding of prejudice, suffering, and effective change to one of these situations. Their projects will be constructed for the purpose of expressing the prejudice and suffering which has been silenced by others, educating people about current atrocities committed against humanity, and fulfilling the call to moral activism which Elie Wiesel makes in his most famous work.Repository CitationGrant, Allison, "Holocaust" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 26.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/26Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Historical Sources

by Lani deGuia

This unit introduces the concepts and skills associated with historical research and interpretation. Students will learn how to identify primary and secondary sources and how to interpret sources in a variety of formats. They will learn how to identify bias and some of the reasons it exists. Students will apply these skills of analysis and interpretation in a performance assessment that asks them to interpret a variety of sources about a historical event. Students will create a presentation for their peers in which they explain this event, based on their source analysis. The purpose of this unit is to prepare students for doing their own historical research and to help them to think more critically about historical information as it is presented to them. An appropriate follow-up unit would include instruction on how to find various sources in the library and on the internet and an assignment of a historical research project.Repository CitationMcPhail, Beth, "Historical Sources" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 20.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/20Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Islam in History

by Lani deGuia

Students will probe the questions of what exactly makes up a religion & how belief systems shape worldviews, spread, and interact as they learn about the founding and spread of Islam. Students will recognize that different belief systems meet similar needs and share common elements, learning Students will explore the history of Islam s origins and its spread and variation up to the present day. They will look at how its ideas have spread, as well as how they were received in different areas of the world. Students will also look at the Crusades as an example of beliefs in conflict, exploring various possible perspectives on the events and situations these invasions produced. In two performance assessments, students will take their new understanding of Islam to more applied settings. First, they will pose as travelers visiting Islamic lands, producing a travel log and interpreting their experience through various scrapbook items from their journeys that stress perspective. Second, students will role play all elements of Meccan society just before Muhammad returned to Mecca and established it as the center of the Islamic Faith.Repository CitationRoehm, Robert, "Islam in History" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 25.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/25Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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In this unit, students will learn about the events leading up to the American Revolution through primary and secondary print sources and artwork. Students will recognize that British and American points of view differed greatly through the pre-Revolutionary time period. These differing points of view are present in primary and secondary print sources and artwork. Students will distinguish between these points of view and explain how different perspectives and ideas played an important role in the causes and events leading to the American Revolution. They will then apply critical thinking skills to create a written account and piece of artwork that interpret an event of the American Revolution from a specific point of view.Repository CitationShay, Michael and Susong, Carrie, "Revolutionary Perspectives: Using Primary Sources and Art to Teach the Causes of the American Revolution" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 18.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/18Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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French Revolution

by Lani deGuia

The students will recognize that there are many different causes that can lead to a revolution. The students will know the different causes of the French Revolution and the effects of that revolution. The students will explore what the French citizens desired to gain from the revolution. There should be an understanding the results of a revolution may or may not have an effect on the lives of citizens. Revolutions do not always equal immediate progress, which is mirrored in the aftermath of the French Revolution. The performance assessment design will give the students to start a revolution where they think a revolution would result in progress. The purpose of this assessment is to think critically about what should be valued in a leader, what rights people deserve to have, and to think about how revolutions begin and can eventually have a lasting impression.Repository CitationSmith, Jenna, "French Revolution" (2006). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 29.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/29Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Texas Revolution

by Lani deGuia

This unit focuses on the road to the Texas Revolution and the Texas Revolution. The unit begins with Students learning the causes of the Texas Revolution as well as the events that led up to the war. The unit will also focus on the people who were involved in the Texas Revolution. The road to revolution will end with students completing a letter writing activity in which they take on the role of a person living in Texas or Mexico before the revolution and write letters about the problems they are facing. Students will also respond to these letters and assess if their letter was persuasive enough to bring a change. The second portion of this teaches the battles and events of the Texas Revolution. In this part of the unit students will get a general overview of all the battles in the Revolution as well as some in-depth lessons on important battles and events. Students will also create character collages on the Heroes of the Texas Revolution. The unit ends with a culminating performance task in which students start their own revolution by creating a brochure and poster to convince people to change something they deal with day to day.Repository CitationGivens, Katharine, "Texas Revolution" (2005). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 2.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/2Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Native Texan Cultures

by Lani deGuia

In this unit, students will explore the basic understanding that geography influences history within the context of Native American cultures. They will begin by finding ways in which geography has influenced their own culture and presenting these connections in a brochure for newcomers to the area. Students will then apply the same concept to the study of native cultures. They will learn about the major tribes and cultural groups that existed in Texas prior to European exploration, and how these cultures reflected the environments in which they lived. The culminating performance assessment will require students to develop a fictional native culture based on a given environment. They will compare their new cultures to those that existed in Texas.Repository CitationMcPhail, Beth, "Native Texan Cultures" (2005). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 6.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/6Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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