Variety of resources focused on the physics of sailing.

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We know that a sailboat can travel with the wind, but what really makes a sailboat move? Join the QUEST crew aboard a sailboat in San Francisco Bay to learn about the physics of sailing. In this story you’ll find… examples of the physics of sailing. demonstrations of how lift works. an explanation of Bernoulli’s principle.
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Student video about the science of sailing. Covers friction, buoyancy, Bernoulli's Principle, Newton's Second Law, and  Newton's Third Law.
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Uploaded on Oct 1, 2008Northern California has a storied, 500-year history of sailing. But despite this rich heritage, scientists and boat designers continue to learn more each day about what makes a sail boat move. Contrary to what you might expect, the physics of sailing still present some mysteries to modern sailors.
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Uploaded on Nov 18, 2011How can a wind-powered sailboat move faster than the wind ? Why do the America's Cup sails look like airplane wings? With the beginner in mind, Exploratorium senior scientist Paul Doherty 
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Published on Aug 5, 2012 How lift actually works with Canadian Olympian Hunter Lowden.How does a sailboat work? The standard idea is that the wind pushes the sails from behind, causing the boat to move forward. Although this technique is used at times, it is not the most efficient way to sail a boat (and it means the boat can never go faster than the wind). Lift is the key mechanism driving a boat forwards. As air flows over the sails, it moves faster over the outer side, creating lower pressure than on the inner side. This produces a force which is mostly to the side and a bit forwards. Lift on the centerboard pushes to the opposite side, cancelling the sideways force and adding a forward component of force to the boat.
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Sailing Physics

by Janet Pinto

How drag, friction, buoyancy, kinetic energy, normal force, gravitational force, act on a sailboat. Vector addition is also discussed.
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Points of Sail

by Janet Pinto

 This Points of Sail video is clearly unique in its multi-view approach to understanding wind direction and the sailing terminology associated with it. This lesson clearly illustrates not only the Point of Sail and the Mainsail position, it also includes the tack, the wind angle.
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ORACLE TEAM USA racing in the 34th America's Cup on San Francisco Bay.
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Published on Aug 7, 2013The AC72 (Americas Cup 72 class) is a wing sail catamaran box rule, governing the construction and operation of the yachts to be used in the 2013 Louis Vuitton Cup selection series and the 2013 America's Cup. This new and revolutionary design is extremely expensive and has allowed the development of foils which lift the hull out of the water in some conditions leading to extreme boat speeds.The tight box rule for the AC72 wing sail catamaran sets very narrow ranges for length, beam and wing sail dimensions, but the devil is in the details. The wing sail originally got the most attention in the media but focus has now shifted to the daggerboards and hydrofoiling.
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“The fastest direction to sail is with the wind coming from the side,” Dr. Anderson said. With the wind coming from the side and the sails turned at about a 45-degree angle, the force from the wind stays constant -- no matter what the speed of the boat is. This is the fastest way to sail. “Very light, very quick sailboats can actually sail up to two times faster than the wind speed with the wind coming from the side,” Dr. Anderson said.
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Newton's Laws

by Sal Khan

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Contents  1 History2 Physics2.1 Introduction2.2 Sails as airfoils2.3 Apparent wind2.4 Effects of wind shear3 Points of sail3.1 Close Hauled or "Beating"3.2 Reaching3.3 Running4 Basic sailing techniques4.1 Trim4.2 Tacking and Gybing4.3 Reducing sail4.4 Sail trimming4.5 Hull trim4.6 Heeling5 Sailing hulls and hull shapes6 Types of sails and layouts6.1 Sailing by high altitude wind power6.2 Rigid foils6.3 Alternative wind-powered vessels6.4 Kitesurfing and windsurfing7 Sailing terminology7.1 Rope and lines7.2 Other terms8 Knots and line handling9 Rules and regulations10 Licensing11 Sailboat racing12 Recreational sailing13 Passagemaking14 See also15 Notes16 Bibliography17 Further reading18 External links
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Intro to Sailing Game

by Janet Pinto

Intro to Sailing is designed to teach the fundamentals of sailboat racing. Start with All Hands on Deck and then proceed to the Skipper's Course and the Web Cup Course.Welcome to Sailing - A synopsis of the contentAll hands on Deck - Information on sailing fundamentalsThe Sailboat - The anatomy of a sailboat.The Sails - The different types of sails, and their purpose.Sailing Downwind - Techniques for sailing downwindSailing Upwind - Techniques for sailing upwindRacing Courses - Synopsis of current sailboat racing coursesBoat Controls - Guide to using the game controlsSkipper's Course - the basic sailboat racing courseWeb Cup Course - an advanced sailboat racing courseAbout the game - the story behind the creation of this game
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BERNOULLI'S EQUATION, EULER'S EQUATION, HOW DOES LIFT SAILBOATS USE LIFT?, HYDRODYNAMIC FORCES, HOW DO SAILORS MAXIMIZE BOAT EFFICIENCY?
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Wind, Sails, and Lift

by Janet Pinto

Article about how lift is applied to sailing.
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Article from The Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/sailing/10335496/Americas-Cup-how-the-yachts-go-faster-than-the-wind.html
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Motion

by Sal Khan

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Momentum

by Sal Khan

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Sailing gives examples of physics: Newton's laws, vector subtraction, Archimedes' principle and others. This support page from Physclips asksHow can a boat sail upwind?How can boats sail faster than the wind?Why are eighteen foot skiffs always sailing upwind?We introduce the physics of sailing to answer these and some other questions. But first:A puzzle.
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How can a wind-powered sailboat move faster than the wind? Why do the America's Cup sails look like airplane wings? With the beginner in mind, Exploratorium senior scientist Paul Doherty introduces the basic physics of sailing and sail design.
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Wind Modeling

by Janet Pinto

The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (http://sccoos.org/) gathers live data about winds, waves, surface currents, temperature, and water quality, and makes it available to everyone. In this piece, Oceanographer Art Miller tells us about this system, and about how America's Cup sailors can use this kind of data and modeling to improve their race performances. To access wind modeling data, visit: http://www.sccoos.org/data/observations/
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Made to Sail

by Janet Pinto

Lesson Plan: Students will be making and testing their own sailboats. They may choose to use the materials that the teacher supplies, or may supply their own. The class will also make a testing tank using simple materials.
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Fluid Friction

by Janet Pinto

This lesson enriches a study of turbulence, work, or power, and dramatically illustrates the energy efficiency gained by streamlining a hull moving through a fluid.
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Tip Don't Flip!

by Janet Pinto

How do the America's Cup boats sail on just one hull? And why do they tip over when they do? Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty dives deeper into the physics of the America's Cup catamarans in "Sailing 102: Tip Don't Flip!"
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In this video from NASA, astronauts demonstrate the Bernoulli Principle on board the International Space Station. Using everyday objects like tissue boxes and a piece of paper, the astronauts show that when a liquid or gas flows more quickly, its pressure decreases. Also shown are some everyday on-Earth examples of the Bernoulli Principle in action.
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Basic Physics II

by Janet Pinto

Basic Physics II updates Basic Physics and is intended to be used as one small part of a multifaceted strategy to teach physics conceptually and mathematically.
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The Glossary database contains 319 terms used in the various fields of sailboat technology.
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Fin Area - Article

by Janet Pinto

Designing the Fin.
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Article with diagrams on aerodynamics in sail shapes.
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Article in which aerodynamics are explored. Diagrams included.  
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Part 2 of article on sail aerodynamics.
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Streamlines & swirls

by Janet Pinto

Article with diagrams covering the complexities of airflow around sails. Includes links to 
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Stanford Yacht Research (SYR) is currently doing a study in performance analysis on yacht sails through experimental and computational methods. This research is being done to study the flow around sails in a wind tunnel and to validate computer results against experimental results.
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Article about lift.
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Article: One way of trying to understand the amount of downwash produced by a lifting surface is called the "momentum" theory of lift.  In this theory, the lift produced by a wing (fin, rudder, sail) is equal to the downward "push" it gives to the air that it passes through.  By deflecting the air downwards, the wing is lifted upwards.  
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The aerodynamicist's way of trying to understand the lift produced by a lifting surface is called the "circulation theory of lift".  This article considers a "simple" lifting surface of infinite length.
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Physics of Sailing Wiki created by students
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This wiki contains basic information about physics of sailing and sailing as a sport. The site is created by using Bryon D. Anderson's article on sailing and physics and visual parts are taken from Sabanc? University Sailing Club, Susail's practice documents for sailors.
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motion

by rahul srivastav

i love the content
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This resource is part of the STEMbite Videos folder. This folder contains STEMbite videos on Physics. You can see all Physics videos here: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNNCUNuTXfdEIeuE-uGoP19-Z7zET07XJ From STEMbite: Nature is so amazing… No, seriously, it is crazy! To understand just how incredible our world is, you need to pull back the curtain and see all the science and math that underpins every part of our day-to-day lives. With STEMbite, you can explore the world like like never before - through the eyes of an enthusiastic young teacher. Subscribe to this channel for engaging, bite-size lessons from a unique first-person perspective through Google Glass.
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Video Presentation on Newton's First law of Motion comes from NextVista for Learning and presented by Mr. Cervantes
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Even theories change

by Janet Pinto

Article explains how theories may be modified or overturned as new evidence and perspective emerges, often due to new technologies.
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projactile motion

by wornsnop wornsnop

:D
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Forces and energy

by schoolphysics website

A most useful worksheet to help 11-14 year old students undestand the relation betwwen forces and energy.
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Q & A with Grant Simmer, COO of Team USA

by Todd A. Sherman (ShermanTank)

Three-time America’s Cup winner Grant Simmer is the America’s Cup champion team Oracle Team USA as COO. His role gives him day-to-day operational responsibility for the American team.In this video, Grant answers questions about sailing and sailboat design.  
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