This collection includes resources that will be helpful in teaching students the concept of Pattern Recognition. Being able to recognize patterns is a fundamental step in the process of problem solving with computational thinking because the patterns help you determine what operations can and need to be done. This is critical in moving forward in computational thinking, especially if the goal is utilizing computers to automate and streamline a process. If the same operation occurs again and again, it may be able to be entered once and repeated.

Collection Contents


Background info on the Rosetta Stone. Web page explains how the Rosetta Stone was key to breaking a code that baffled scholars for centuries: Egyptian hieroglyphs.
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People Patterns

by Janet Pinto

Fun activity in pattern recognition: If you see a line of people do you think that you could discover a pattern and figure out who should come next? Could you complete the sequence before the penalty word \"Pattern\" is spelled out?
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Limerick Factory

by Janet Pinto

Poet Edward Lear is one of the most famous writers of limericks. He was able to put words together to create some very funny pieces of nonsense verse. Pattern recognition as applied to ELA!
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Syntax Store

by Janet Pinto

The syntax, or word order, of a sentence is something you might take for granted. But the way we construct sentences is important, and our constructions often follow a pattern. Here\'s your chance to see how.
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Number Cracker

by Janet Pinto

Cute game where users help Mr. Cracker obtain the secret code - makes use of pattern reecognition skills in a series of numbers - several levels of difficulty.
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The Empty Triangle

by Janet Pinto

Great brain teaser type practice for recognizing patterns.
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Pattern Generator

by Janet Pinto

This activity provides exploration of patterns using shapes, letters and numbers. This activity would work well in groups of 1 or 2 for about 15-20 minutes if you use the exploration questions and 10-15 minutes otherwise.
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From Code.org: With nothing but paper and markers, students will learn the four steps of computational thinking. After a brief introduction, students should be split into groups where they will have to create directions for other students to draw a specific monster (from a catalog of pre-selected monsters). The entire task must be decomposed, then teams will analyze all monsters in the catalog for patterns, abstract different details from the monsters, then use that information to create an algorithm (directions) for another team to draw a certain monster. Teams will then switch algorithms with another group and draw the monster based on what that algorithm indicates. Is the drawing what the original team intended?
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Information about how experts used pattern recognition to identify an unsigned lost painting to Leonardo Da Vinci.
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Ceasar’s Cipher

by Janet Pinto

This activity allows the user to experiment with encoding and decoding messages using modular arithmetic. This activity would work well in mixed ability groups of four or five for about forty-five to fifty minutes if you use the exploration questions and twenty minutes otherwise. By shodor.org.
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A cipher is a message that has been written in such a way (encoded) that it is unreadable by others. In this lesson, students will use mapping to encode a sentence. Students who have ever played “Hangman” or watched Wheel of Fortune may find that those experiences help in this exercise. Students will work with a partner to create an algorithm that describes the encryption process. They will also examine encoded and decoded messages to recognize patterns to help decode messages and develop strategies to decompose the problem.
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Guess my Button

by Janet Pinto

Fun activity on pattern recognition: Sorting and classifying can help you discover a lot about the patterns of objects, people, and places. To begin, you might ask yourself a few simple questions: What\'s the same? What\'s different? And this is the strategy you\'ll need for Guess My Button. The computer has secretly picked out one of the sixteen buttons you see below. What you need to do is determine which button it is.
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