Oceanography Collection for High School

Liquid Robotics Projects Oceans cover most of Earth’s surface with an average depth of more than two miles. Placing observation equipment anywhere in this vast area is difficult and expensive, yet the oceans provide essential resources, influence climate, and enable human life to exist on land. Understanding them requires detailed observation. Liquid Robotics’ patented Wave Glider unmanned maritime vehicle* (UMV), which uses waves to propel itself, provides a new way to achieve this understanding.

By harvesting abundant natural energy, Wave Gliders provide a persistent ocean presence. With a demonstrated endurance exceeding one year, Wave Gliders are now in service with a variety of customers and ongoing engineering development is regularly adapting the vehicle to new applications.

Collection Contents


Cross-curricular activity in which students will review the water cycle and investigate how a region's water supply can become contaminated.
Member Rating
Curriki Rating2.3
On a scale of 0 to 3

Why Whales Don't Have Legs

by ALTEC The University of Kansas

Why Whales Don't Have Legs is a well known activity with high school and middle school marine biology teachers. I do not get credit for creating the project, but I did modify it to fit my population. You can find the RubiStar rubric for this project at http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&module=Rubistar&rubric_id=82118
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

Keeping a Field Journal 2

by Sophie Teacher

Topic: Biology Subtopic: Tools and Methods Type: Article Level: for grades 6 through 12 Time: Less than 1 period Origin: Biodiversity Counts This article, part of Biodiversity Counts, takes a look at how botanist and curator Brian Boom applies the notes in his field journal. The article, which is available both online and as a printable PDF, discusses: the organization system of his field journals how he uses the information in them to label his dried and mounted specimens his use of both rough sketches and photographs his tips for what students should record in their field journals Supplement a study of biodiversity with an activity drawn from this article about keeping a field journal. Ask students what they think happens to the information in field journals once researchers return to the lab. 2. Send students to this online article, or print copies of the article for them to read. 3. Have students write a one-page reaction to the article, comparing their initial ideas to what they learned.
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

A look at the symbiotic relationships in fringing reefs. The video starts with an exploration of the birds, invertebrates and fish that live in and off the shallow waters and tidal pools and moves on to explore some of the marine life and the symbiotic relationships in the shallow coral reefs.
Member Rating
Curriki Rating3
On a scale of 0 to 3

Oceanographic Scientist (sv)

by NextVista for Learning

This video about an oceanographic scientist is part of a series designed to help students learn more about different careers. This video is part of the video collection at NextVista.org (http://nextvista.org), a proud partner of Curriki.
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

2010 - 2011

by Sue Costagliola East Meadow School District

CAPs
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

Liquid Robotics is launching a grand challenge, scientific Pacific Crossing of 4 ocean robots (Wave Gliders) on 11/17 in San Fran Bay. They will be in the ocean for a year collecting ocean data and continuously feeding of this data back to anyone who registers for the data. LiquidRobotics is also launching a contest for the most innovative scientific research conducted on the PacX Challenge data. The prize is 6 months of the winner's customized Wave Glider route and sensors. Really cool. Teachers, get in on this!!! Throughout this year, the LiquidRobotics team wants to work with you, the global educational community as well offer a Young Innovators award at the end. Get your students involved in following the Wave Gliders over the year with STEM projects.
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

Oceanography Careers

by Janet Pinto

Links to great resources for inspiring Oceanography and Marine Careers
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

Great list of various web resources about oceanography.
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated

COME ON THE ADVENTURE!! Four Wave Gliders. 300 Days. 25,000 Miles. 2,250,000 Data Points. Open Source. Real Time. In our lifetime, robots have traveled to the moon. They’ve been to Mars. They’ve cleaned our pools and they’ve helped perform surgeries. But no robot has ever crossed the largest ocean on the planet. That’s about to change. What is PacX? On November 17th, 2011, in San Francisco, Liquid Robotics will launch four Wave Gliders that will attempt to travel the longest distance at sea ever completed by an unmanned marine vehicle. The robots will travel together to Hawaii and then take separate routes across the Pacific, one pair arriving in Japan and the other in Australia. While at sea, the Wave Gliders will be routed across regions never before remotely surveyed and will continuously transmit valuable data on salinity and water temperature, waves, weather, fluorescence, and dissolved oxygen. This data will be made available in near real-time to all registered individuals. Oceanographic organizations already planning to use the data gathered during the Pacific crossing include Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and the Monterey Naval Post Graduate School. What sensors are onboard the Wave Gliders? The following sensors are installed on all four Wave Gliders. The sampling interval for all sensors is 10 minutes. Seabird GPCTD with Dissolved Oxygen Sensor – measures water conductivity, temperature, depth, and dissolved oxygen just below the float of the Wave Glider. Datawell MOSE-G Directional Wave Sensor – measures significant wave height, average period, peak period, and peak direction. Airmar PB200 WeatherStation – measures air temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed, wind gust speed, and wind direction one meter above the deck of the Wave Glider. Turner Designs C3 Submersible Fluorometer – measures chlorophyll-A and crude oil fluorescence, as well as turbidity and water temperature just below the float of the Wave Glider. The PacX Challenge Prize Download the PacX Challenge application form PDF? “Liquid Robotics invites scientists to embark on a grand challenge journey with us as we cross the Pacific on a voyage of scientific discovery. These Wave Gliders are much like small ‘spacecraft’ that open up new opportunities for robotic exploration. I challenge all scientists who are interested in advancing ocean exploration to take advantage of this unique opportunity. What scientific questions can we address with this new and unique data set?” Ed Lu, chief of innovative applications at Liquid Robotics. As part of the PacX pacific crossing, Liquid Robotics is pleased to announce the PacX Challenge open to scientists around the world. Those who wish to compete for the PacX Challenge prize are required to submit a one-page research abstract outlining their scientific intentions for the data collected during the Pacific crossing. A board of distinguished U.S. and international ocean scientists will evaluate the submissions and select one grand prize winner who best represents the spirit of exploration and discovery embodied by this journey. The grand prize winner will receive six months of free Wave Glider data services and will work with Liquid Robotics to chart the course and mission for the six month deployment, including configuration of onboard sensors. The submission deadline for participation in the PacX Challenge is April 23, 2012. The Wave Glider The Wave Glider is the first marine robot to use only the ocean’s endless supply of wave energy for propulsion (no manpower, no emissions, no refueling). The Wave Glider employs a multi-patented design that allows it to cost-effectively collect and transmit data gathered during year-long missions, over distances of thousands of miles, or while holding station. Data gathered by Wave Gliders will help us address the biggest challenges our marine environments face – including ocean acidification, fisheries management, and natural disaster mitigation.
Member Rating
Curriki RatingNR
'NR' - This resource has not been rated
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!

Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467