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Lesson plans created for grades 8, 10, 11, and 12 Social Studies classes concerning West Virginia's first African American attorney, J.R. Clifford (1848-1933). These lesson plans focus specifically on his most famous case, Williams v. Tucker County Board of Education, as well as his involvement in the formation of the Niagara Movement, a forerunner to the Modern Civil Rights Movement.
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This lesson walks students through the critical attributes of Western industrialization towards the end of the 19th centruy.
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Through this lesson, the student will come to understand the significance of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake through the study of primary documents. The student will also apply his/her research skills to the study of primary documents from various other key historical events.
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This lesson will introduce the students to the challenges of American foreign policy in the late 19th century and specifically to the political debate over whether the United States should acquire further territory and/or become a European-style empire. With the help of primary source documents students will debate this issue to help them come to their own assessment of the idea of an American Empire.
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This lesson plan explores the Spanish-American war through the use of primary sources and a WebQuest Interactive, focusing on the causes of the war and the political debate in the United States over the advisability of intervening militarily in the affairs of countries.
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The treaty of peace ending the Spanish-American War resulted in the United States obtaining the Philippine Islands from Spain. Despite intense political opposition to the acquisition of the islands, the U.S. Senate ratified the treaty. The political impact of anti-imperialist arguments, the difficult experience of suppressing native Filipino resistance, and the lack of attractive opportunities for further territorial expansion, all effectively stalled the American imperialist/expansionist movement. The United States would experiment thereafter with less intrusive means of exercising international influence, such as Open Doors and protectorates, which contained their own practical and moral challenges.In this lesson, students examines the controversy surrounding the Philippines as they read documents and participate in a role playing exercise that places them as advisors to the President.
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In 1899 and 1900, Secretary of State John Hay issued what became known as the Open Door Notes to foreign powers involved in China. Secretary Hay called on those powers to respect the rights of each other, to agree to an open market and equal trading opportunities for merchants of all nationalities, and to respect the territorial and administrative integrity of China. The Open Door Notes were an important step in the process by which the United States emerged as a global power and developed a distinctive and expansive set of interests in East Asia. In this lesson, students will explore the impact of these notes on both America and foreign countries.
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