Find and share high-quality CCSS aligned math lesson plans that use real-world examples to teach problem solving and critical thinking on a variety of topics.

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STEW is an online resource of peer-reviewed statistics lesson plans for K-12 teachers.  From candy and carnival games to NFL quarterbacks' salaries, STEW's lesson plans engage students in hands-on, real-world applications of statistics concepts.
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NCTM Illuminations

by Amelia Ruzicka

The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics website is loaded with quality lesson plans, virtual manipulatives, and other interactives.
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This is one of my favorite resources when I'm looking for new lessons, activities, and strategies to implement in my math classroom.  I really love "My Favorite No," "Graphing Equations Full-Body Style," and "Sorting and Classifying Equations."  What are your favorite lessons on the site?
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CC Better Lesson

by Amelia Ruzicka

Find an entire shcool year of Common Core-aligned lessons for math grades K-12 created by master teachers.
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This YouCubed unit was created by Math for America Fellows, Yekaterina Milvidskaia and Tiana Tebelman who teach 8th Grade Mathematics at Vista Magnet Middle School in Vista, CA. It contains 15 lessons (including a quiz and an assessment) that are based on classes that are 84 minutes long. The goal of this unit is to show students the importance of looking for patterns and why there is a need to generalize them, especially if there is a very large figure number. Through this unit, students will have to make sense of and look for structure in the patterns. Students will learn to justify their reasoning mathematically and visually. They will be asked to construct mathematical arguments and challenge the reasoning of others. In this unit students will learn about functions and relations and different ways to represent them. Lastly, this unit will give students the foundation they need to be successful with linear functions, which is one of the most important concepts in Math 8. By the end of this unit students will understand various ways to represent functions and know how to create a general rule. 
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The unit contains 19  lessons and two formal assessments.    This unit addresses two essential questions:How do we use mathematics to find the height of things that are difficult to measure?  How do we make a convincing argument?The High School Common Core State Standards addressed are: Geometry: Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry (G.SRT)1,2,3,4,5,6,8Geometry: Congruence (G.CO) 7,8Math Mathematical Practices (MPS)  1,2,3,4,5,6,7
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Domino’s pizza is delicious. The company’s success is proof that people enjoy their pies. The company is also tech savvy: you can order online, and they even have a pizza tracker so you can keep tabs on your delivery!The website is great. But one thing it’s not is transparent. Domino's does not tell you how much the component pieces cost; they only tell you an item's final price after you build it. In this lesson, students use linear equations to find the base price (y-intercept) and cost per additional topping (slope). Let's find out how much Domino's is really charging for pizza
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In 1965 Gordon Moore, computer scientist and Intel co-founder, predicted that computer processor speeds would double every two years. Twelve years later the first modern video game console, the Atari 2600, was released.In this lesson, students write an exponential function based on the Atari 2600 and Moore's Law, and research other consoles to determine whether they've followed Moore's Law
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In the 2005 Conference-USA Tournament game, Memphis player Darius Washington Jr. was fouled at the buzzer during a three-point shot. With his team down by two to Louisville, he stepped up to the foul line for three shots.In this lesson, students will compute the probabilities of a win, loss, or tie for Memphis. They will also determine whether or not it was smart for Louisville to foul at the buzzer, and will investigate the conditions when fouling at the buzzer in a close game makes sense
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Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt is fast…very fast. He’s also tall…very tall. At 1.96 meters (6’5”), Bolt towers over his competition. So does this give him an unfair advantage, and what would happen if instead of everyone running the same distance, Olympic sprinters ran distances based on their heights?In this lesson students use proportions to determine what would happen if Olympic races were organized differently. Would Bolt still win? If sports like boxing and wrestling have weight classes, should track have height classes?
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Many restaurants are required to post nutritional information for their foods, including the number of calories. But what does “550 calories” really mean? Instead of calories, what if McDonald’s rewrote its menu in terms of exercise?In this lesson, students will use unit rates and proportional reasoning to determine how long they’d have to exercise to burn off different McDonald’s menu items. For instance, a 160-pound person would have to run for 50 minutes to burn off a Big Mac. So…want fries with that?!
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At the end of the popular musical Les Misérables, a dejected Inspector Javert throws himself off a bridge and into the River Seine. As he falls, he sings…and sings…and sings. According to the song, he falls for a full eight seconds!In this lesson students use quadratic functions and information about how objects fall (i.e. gravity) to determine how high Javert’s bridge must have been. Then, they use linear functions to figure out how fast he was traveling when he hit the water, and whether we can believe anything that Broadway says…er, sings.
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This resource folder contains sample documents from a consumer math unit for middle and high school.  In this unit, students are randomly assigned jobs.  Salaries are based upon U.S. median incomes for the various careers.  Students learn about payroll deductions, how to read a paystub, how to create a budget, and how to use checking/savings accounts and credit/debit cards.  Throughout the four-week unit, students must pay for an apartment, a car, groceries, utilities, and various "incidentals" out of their salary.  All of their shopping is completed with real apartment and car magazines and grocery ads. Late assignments, past-due bills, lost checkbooks, and other behaviors also warrant monetary penalties.  This engaging real-life unit teaches essential consumer math skills and important life lessons.
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A State-wide lesson plan format for all colleges of teacher education
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A rubric for assessing all lesson plans in colleges of teacher education
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A sample lesson to familiarize pre-service teachers with the required elements of an effective lesson
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