IN COLLECTION
Introduction:
 

Prior to beginning the lesson: (1) Photocopy the Problem of the Day onto transparency paper for the overhead projector.
 

Group Size: Whole class
 

Learning Objectives:
 

Students will be able to:

  • Compare fractions and explain why fractions are smaller or bigger than one another.
  • Understand that bigger fractions have smaller denominators.
  • Understand that two different fractions can equal one another.
Materials:
 

Problem of the Day (see attachment), “Fractions Around Us” Chart (from Lesson #2), paper plates (3 per student), rulers, red crayons, blue crayons, green crayons, overhead projector
 

Procedures:
 

Lesson Introduction: Display Problem of the Day on the overhead projector. Ask students: What strategy should we use to solve this problem? Guide them towards drawing a picture. Solve the problem together as a class. Students can copy problem and solution into math notebooks.

  1. Review the chart “Fractions Around Us” from Lesson #2. If students have any other ideas, add them to the list.
  2. Tell students: We all know that one place we see fractions is pizza. Today, we are going to practice fractions with pizza.
  3. Distribute paper plates, crayons, and rulers to students.
  4. Direct students to mark the center of a paper plate with a dot and then to use a ruler to draw a line across the plate. Ask students: How should we label the parts of the plate? Instruct student to label each part with “1/2” and to color in one part with a red crayon.
  5. Direct students to mark the center of the second paper plate with a dot and to use a ruler to divide the plate into fourths. Ask students: How should we label the parts of the plate? Instruct students to label each part with “1/4” and to color in one part with a red crayon.
  6. Direct students to mark the center of the third paper plate with a dot and to use a ruler to divide the plate into eighths. Ask students: How should we label the parts of the plate? Instruct students to label each part with “1/8” and to color in one part with a red crayon.
  7. Have students look at all three plates. Ask them: Which piece of pizza is the biggest? Which is the smallest? What happens to the size of the pizza slice as the denominator gets bigger?
  8. Tell students: Look at your pizza that is divided into fourths. Take a green crayon and color in one-fourth green. Once students have done that, ask them: Look at your fourths pizza again. It looks like two-fourths is the same as what other piece of pizza? Make sure students understand that two-fourths is the same as one-half. Write “2/4 = 1/2” on the board.
  9. Tell students: Look at your pizza that is divided into eighths. Take a green crayon and color in one-eighth green. Once students have done that, ask them: Look at your eighths pizza again. It looks like two-eighths is the same as what other piece of pizza? Make sure students understand that two-eighths is the same as one-fourth. Write “2/8 = 1/4” on the board.
  10. Tell students: Take a look at one-half and one fourth. What can we say about those two fractions? Guide students towards the answer, and write “1/2 > 1/4” on the board. Ask students: What do you notice about the size of the fraction as the denominator gets bigger?
  11. Continue asking questions, making comparisons, and writing them on the board until students understand.
  12. Challenge students to come up with their own comparisons.
Modifications: For students with special needs, teacher can assist with writing when necessary and allow for extra time.
 

Assessment:
 

Teacher should monitor student participation and independent work to ensure all students understand the concept.
 

Benchmark or Standards:
 

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Number and Operations Standard:

  • Develop a sense of whole numbers and represent and use them in flexible ways, including relating, composing, and decomposing numbers.
  • Understand and represent commonly used fractions, such as 1/4, 1/3, and 1/2.
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Data and Analysis and Probability Standard:

  • Pose questions and gather data about themselves and their surroundings.
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Process Standard:

  • Build new mathematical knowledge through problem solving.
  • Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.
Attached Files:
 

    Lesson9Resources.FunwithFractions.pdf 
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