Introduction: Prior to beginning the lesson: (1) Cut out and laminate Vocabulary Cards for display in the classroom; (2) Photocopy Map of Native American Nations onto transparency paper for the overhead projector; (3) Photocopy Plains Nation onto transparency paper for the overhead projector; (4) Photocopy and assemble Book of Native American Nations (1 per student).

 

Group Size: Whole Class

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to:

·          Use a map to locate where Plains Native Americans lived.

·          Explain how Plains Native Americans met their basic needs with natural resources.

 

Materials: Vocabulary Cards (see attachment), Map of Native American Nations (see attachment), Plains Nation (see attachment), Book of Native American Nations (see attachment), overheard projector, pointer.

 

Procedure:

1.       Display Map of Native American Nations on overheard projector. Tell students: Today we are going to learn about the Plains Native American Nation. Display vocabulary card “Plains”. Call a student up to point out where the Plains Nation was located.

2.       Tell students: The Plains Native Americans had to meet their needs just like other Native American nations. Let’s think about what their life was like. Give students time to share ideas.

3.       Tell students: The Plains Native Americans lived in grassland. Buffalo were very common in this area, and the Plains Native American hunted buffalo. They used buffalo for food, clothing, and shelter.

4.       Continue to tell students: The Plain Native Americans built homes called teepees. Display Plains Nation on the overheard projector and show students the teepee picture. Ask students: What do you know about teepees? Give students time to share ideas. Continue to tell students: Teepees were made out of buffalo hide and pine trees. Long poles from pine trees made up the frame. And the frame was covered with buffalo skin. They left a hole at the top for smoke to come to out when they were cooking, like a chimney. The hole could be closed up in bad weather. Large teepees used as many as twenty buffalo hides to make. Give students time to make more observations.

5.       Ask students: Does anybody have a guess how the Plains Native Americans got food? Give students time to share ideas, and then tell them: Plains Native Americans hunted buffalo. That was their main source of food. They also gathered vegetables that grew wild such as onions and turnips. Show students picture of buffalo on overhead projector, and give them time to make observations.

6.       Tell students: Plains Native Americans also used buffalo for their clothing. Show students picture of clothing on overhead projector, and give them time to make observations.

7.       Tell students: The last important thing we will discuss is quillwork. Does anybody know what a quill is? Give students time to make guesses, and then tell them: Quills are the spikes on porcupines. Plains women would die the quills and then embroider or sew them onto clothing and baskets. Only certain women were trained to do this, and it took them years to learn. Show students the quillwork pictures on the overhead projector, and give them time to make observations.

8.       Tell students: You have learned a lot of information about the Plains Nation. Now you are going to record this information in your book. Distribute Book of Native American Nations from the previous day. Instruct students to complete page four. At the bottom of the page instruct students to write one thing they learned in a complete sentence. Leave Plains Nation displayed on the overheard projector for students to see while working.

9.       Collect books for use the following day.

 

Modifications: For students with special needs, provided one-on-one assistance with writing as necessary.

 

Assessment: Teacher should circulate classroom to ensure students are writing and drawing correct answers.

 

Benchmark or Standards:

National Council for the Social Studies Standards

I. Culture and Cultural Diversity

a. Explore and describe similarities and differences in the in the ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns.

d. Compare ways in which people from cultures think about and deal with their physical environment and social conditions.

III. People Places and Environments

        b. Interpret, use, and distinguish various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes,

        and photographs.

        h. Examine the interaction of human beings and their physical environment, the use of land,

        building of cities, and ecosystem changes in selected locales and regions.

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