Introduction: Prior to beginning the lesson: (1) Cut out and laminate Vocabulary Cards for display in the classroom; (2) Photocopy Map of Native American Nations onto transparency paper for the overhead projector; (3) Photocopy Great Basin Nation onto transparency paper for the overhead projector; (4) Photocopy and assemble Book of Native American Nations (1 per student).

 

Group Size: Whole Class

 

Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to:

·          Use a map to locate where Great Basin Native Americans lived.

·          Explain how Great Basin Native Americans met their basic needs with natural resources.

 

Materials: Vocabulary Cards (see attachment), Map of Native American Nations (see attachment), Great Basin Nation (see attachment), Book of Native American Nations (see attachment), overheard projector, pointer.

 

Procedure:

1.       Display Map of Native American Nations on overheard projector. Tell students: Yesterday we learned all about the Pacific Northwest Native Americans. Can anybody tell me something you learned about them? Give students time to share answers.

2.       Tell students: Today we are going to learn about the Great Basin Native American Nation. Display vocabulary card Great Basin”.

3.       Display Map of Native American Nations on the overheard projector, and call a student up to point out where the Great Basin Nation was located.

4.       Tell students: The Great Basin Native Americans had to meet their needs just like the Pacific Northwest nation. Let’s think about how their life might have been. The Great Basin region is a desert. Who can tell us what a desert is? Allow students time to give ideas, and then tell them: A dessert is an area with very little water.

5.       Continue to tell students: Only certain animals and certain plants can grow with little water in a desert. The Great Basin Native Americans were always moving around in order to find that food. Display vocabulary card “nomad”. Tell students: A nomad is a person that is always moving and never stays in one place.

6.       Display Great Basin Nation on overhead projector, and show students the picture of Great Basin housing. Tell students: The Great Basin Nation lived in houses that looked like tents. They had to have shelter they could pick up and take with them because they were nomads who were always on the move.

7.       Tell students: Let’s move onto food. We know the Great Basin Nation was in the desert. Does anybody have a guess how they got their food in the desert? Give students time to make guesses. Then tell students: The Great Basin Nation gathered their food. That means they collected whatever plants and nuts they could find to eat. They also hunted small animals, such as rabbits. Show students the food picture on the overheard projector.

8.       Ask students: Now we know what the Great Basin Nation did for shelter and food. What other need is there? Guide students to answer clothing. Ask students: What do you think they did for clothing? Give students time to share ideas. Tell students: The Great Basin Nation used rabbit skin or rabbit hide to make their clothes. Display vocabulary card “hide” and tell students: Hide is another word for skin. Show students the clothing picture on the overhead projector.

9.       Tell students: One more important part of the Great Basin Nation is basket-making. They were experts at weaving baskets. Since they lived in the desert, they needed to catch and save water whenever they found it. So they used baskets to store water. They also used baskets to store all the  food they gathered. Show students the basket picture on the overhead projector.

10.    Tell students: You have learned a lot of information about the Great Basin Nation. Now you are going to record this information in your book. Distribute Book of Native American Nations from the previous day. Instruct students to complete page two. At the bottom of the page instruct students to write one thing they learned in a complete sentence. Leave Great Basin Nation displayed on the overheard projector for students to see while working.

11.    Collect books for use the following day.

 

Modifications: For students with special needs, provided one-on-one assistance with writing as necessary.

 

Assessment: Teacher should circulate classroom to ensure students are writing and drawing correct answers.

 

Benchmark or Standards:

National Council for the Social Studies Standards

I. Culture and Cultural Diversity

a. Explore and describe similarities and differences in the in the ways groups, societies, and cultures address similar human needs and concerns.

d. Compare ways in which people from cultures think about and deal with their physical environment and social conditions.

III. People Places and Environments

        b. Interpret, use, and distinguish various representations of the earth, such as maps, globes,

        and photographs.

        h. Examine the interaction of human beings and their physical environment, the use of land,

        building of cities, and ecosystem changes in selected locales and regions.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!

Non-profit Tax ID # 203478467