This collection contains teaching and learning resources for a high school Civics and Citizenship course.

Collection Contents


Preserving the Bill of Rights is designed to teach students the relevance of the Bill of Rights in their own lives. The ten units contain twenty teacher-friendly lesson plans with step-by-step directions for activities, student handouts, extension activities, key terms, and primary sources. Each lesson is aligned to national Social Studies standards and the Common Core Literacy in History/Social Studies Standards.
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A brief introduction to the arguments of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists. 1-2 day lesson plan.
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The powerpoint that accompanies the Civic Duty vs. Uninformed Voters lesson plan
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Civil Society

by Learn Liberty

Have you ever wondered what the core principles of a free society are? Well, this is the place for you. In this program we’ll explore the 10 fundamental principles for a free and prosperous society hosted and presented by three outstanding faculty: Prof. Peter Jaworski from Georgetown University, Prof. Diana Thomas from Creighton University, and Prof. Christopher Koopman from George Mason University. Each faculty member will present these principles from the economic, philosophical, and legal perspectives and provide real world examples to deepen your understanding.
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First Amendment freedoms like press, assembly, and petition are essential to self-government. The Founders saw these freedoms as a bulwark of free, republican government and a means of assuring justice in government.
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Bill of Rights - Primary Source

by Education Department National Constitution Center

The first 10 amendments to the Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights, guarantee essential rights and civil liberties, such as the right to free speech, the right to bear arms, and the right to a fair trial, as well as protecting the role of the states in American government.
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A revised copy of Lesson Plan 3.
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Section 1 Can I Be an Entrepreneur?

by Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education CEE

Purpose This section is designed to help students learn more about themselves and the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. ' Objectives: Upon completion of this unit, students will be able to: • assess their personal characteristics • identify how entrepreneurship affects life-style • evaluate life-style preferences • recognize the importance of career planning
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Which are more important, economic liberties or civil liberties? The conventional view portrays conservatives as caring more about economic liberties than civil liberties. Liberals, on the other hand, are conventionally viewed as caring about civil liberties more than economic liberties. To Prof. Aeon Skoble, this distinction between economic and civil liberties is fictitious. The influence of market exchanges and civil liberties on one another is inseparable.
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Those “lazy, self-centered, millennials” get a bad rap. Jared Meyer, author of “Disinherited: How Washington Is Betraying America’s Young” explains how this generation both has higher standards of living and more government barriers to success than any other.
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