Introduce your unit on the Gilded Age with this interactive Data Game and choose from lessons and activities from the Bill of Rights Institute.

 

 

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Gilded Age and Progressive Era

by Bill of Rights Institute EDUCATING INDIVIDUALS about THE CONSTITUTION

From 1876-1920, the United States went through a period of rapid technological, demographic, and political change. The Gilded Age and Progressive Era curriculum provides students an in-depth look at this formative period in United States history. Through primary-source-based activities and engaging narratives, students will be exposed to this fascinating period and analyze its numerous parallels to today.
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Use this interactive data tool to spark conversation about the Gilded Age. Could also be used as exit ticket. Data Sources: Agricultural employment http://mjperry.blogspot.com/2011/07/creative-destruction-of-jobs-makes-us.html Foreign born population https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/03/09/u-s-immigrant-population-projected-to-rise-even-as-share-falls-among-hispanics-asians/ US share of worldwide manufacturing https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R42135.pdf Find the full Gilded Age collection here: https://www.curriki.org/oer/Gilded-Age-314308
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In this unit students will be focusing on the American society during the Gilded Age. Students will understand the rise of the Gilded Age through invention and technology. Students will see how progress includes opportunities and challenges and the relationship between technology and economic development. Students will be able to see the interdependence between environment and migration due to technological and economic development. During this unit students will also analyze the growth of business, labor unrest, immigration and social inequalities that are inevitable in human societies. The culminating performance assessment allows students to explore the complexities of society during this period.Repository CitationMcHenry, Caesie, "All That Glitters is not Gold (Gilded Age)" (2008). Understanding by Design: Complete Collection. Paper 53.http://digitalcommons.trinity.edu/educ_understandings/53Creative Commons LicenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.
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Gilded Age

by Sandy Gade

Overview of the Gilded Age. Use the tabs on the screen to see the overview textbook events people music film images Do History multimedia For Teachers links quizzes Mintz, S., & McNeil, S. (2013). Digital History. Retrieved March 19, 2013 from http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu
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This lesson will introduce the students to the challenges of American foreign policy in the late 19th century and specifically to the political debate over whether the United States should acquire further territory and/or become a European-style empire. With the help of primary source documents students will debate this issue to help them come to their own assessment of the idea of an American Empire.
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Progressive Era

by Sandy Gade

Overview of the Progressive Era. Use the tabs on the screen to see the overview textbook events people music film images Do History multimedia For Teachers links quizzes Mintz, S., & McNeil, S. (2013). Digital History. Retrieved March 19, 2013 from http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu
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