Resources for teaching High School Civics and Government course.

Collection Contents

Civics Curriculum

by Andrew Pass

The first unit contains overarching themes including factors underlying the formation of the United States of America and its system of government. Domestic and foreign influences were catalysts in the foundation of our political system. Unit one identifies important vectors in the beginnings of American culture and society. Unit two focuses on the United States Constitution as the essential document for the founding of the United States of America as a new nation. Several key ideas and documents that influenced the creation of the Constitution are spanned, as well as an in-depth examination of the Articles as they relate to government and citizens rights and responsibilities, and the continuing effect of the Constitution on contemporary issues. Examined at the core of unit three are the structure and functionality of the United States government at the local, state, and federal levels. The lessons within are designed to challenge students to recognize cross-governmental similarities and differences, and apply such an understanding to events that significantly impact students’ lives. The fourth and final unit moves outside of the borders of the United States and considers the impact of the United States system of government on a global scale. The lessons have been designed to engage students with the pertinent issues of world politics, international trade relations, and foreign affairs policies.
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Civics

by Justin March

This collection contains lesson plans for a Freshman level Civics and Citizenship class.
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Which are more important, economic liberties or civil liberties? The conventional view portrays conservatives as caring more about economic liberties than civil liberties. Liberals, on the other hand, are conventionally viewed as caring about civil liberties more than economic liberties. To Prof. Aeon Skoble, this distinction between economic and civil liberties is fictitious. The influence of market exchanges and civil liberties on one another is inseparable.
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Civil Society

by Learn Liberty

Have you ever wondered what the core principles of a free society are? Well, this is the place for you. In this program we’ll explore the 10 fundamental principles for a free and prosperous society hosted and presented by three outstanding faculty: Prof. Peter Jaworski from Georgetown University, Prof. Diana Thomas from Creighton University, and Prof. Christopher Koopman from George Mason University. Each faculty member will present these principles from the economic, philosophical, and legal perspectives and provide real world examples to deepen your understanding.
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Constitution Hall Pass - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Legacy of Service

by Education Department National Constitution Center

Give your students a “hall pass” to explore America’s civic holidays and constitutional history! Created and produced by the National Constitution Center, Constitution Hall Pass features the museum\'s education staff, distinguished scholars, and even some famous faces who bring America’s democracy and the stories of “We the People” to life.
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Have you ever wondered what the core principles of a free society are? Well, this is the place for you. In this program we’ll explore the 10 fundamental principles for a free and prosperous society hosted and presented by three outstanding faculty: Prof. Peter Jaworski from Georgetown University, Prof. Diana Thomas from Creighton University, and Prof. Christopher Koopman from George Mason University. Each faculty member will present these principles from the economic, philosophical, and legal perspectives and provide real world examples to deepen your understanding.
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Bill of Rights - Primary Source

by Education Department National Constitution Center

The first 10 amendments to the Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights, guarantee essential rights and civil liberties, such as the right to free speech, the right to bear arms, and the right to a fair trial, as well as protecting the role of the states in American government.
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First Amendment freedoms like press, assembly, and petition are essential to self-government. The Founders saw these freedoms as a bulwark of free, republican government and a means of assuring justice in government.
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BILL OF RIGHTS

by Education Department National Constitution Center

This lesson, which includes a pre-lesson and several post-lesson ideas, is intended to be used in conjunction with the National Constitution Center’s Bill of Rights show. Together, they provide students with first-hand experience about one of our nation’s most important documents. In this lesson, students begin by learning about the specific rights and freedoms protected by the Bill of Rights. In order to understand the preamble and ten amendments clearly, they also work in small groups to “translate” the Bill of Rights into student-friendly language. Finally, students begin making connections between the ten amendments and real-life scenarios through playing Bill of Rights Bingo. After the NCC program, which provides students with an overview of the Bill of Rights, its history, and its modern-day relevance, students return to the classroom to participate in one of two follow-up activities. In the first activity, students search through newspaper, magazine and online articles to find examples of news events that show the ten amendments in action. In the second activity, students write and ratify a Bill of Rights for their classroom. Designed for students in grade 6-8, this lesson takes approximately five or six class periods from beginning to end.
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The powerpoint that accompanies the Civic Duty vs. Uninformed Voters lesson plan
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Benefits of civic involvement.
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Have you ever thought much about property rights? Many believe ownership protections primarily favor the wealthy, but it turns out that the wealthy and politically connected actually benefit more when ownership is vulnerable. Without strong property rights, those with the power are able to take property from those who lack such political connections. In places like Zimbabwe—where the government is able to confiscate profits, merchandise, and even businesses with ease—the lack of property protections has been one cause of the country's decline. Today, Zimbabwe is the poorest country in the world, and eroded property rights are at least partially to blame. Prof. Dan Russell argues that "doing less to protect ownership turns out to be a really effective way to create poverty." Perhaps property rights deserve protecting. Except, maybe, among Finnish race car drivers.
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