Collection of Chemistry animations. Topics include the atom, formulas and equations, physical properties of matter, periodic table, chemical bonding, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium, acids, bases and salts, and oxidation and reduction.

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Interactive, research-based simulations of several chemistry concepts including solubility, pH scale, chemical reactions and atomic interactions - help your students plan investigative procedures.
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Substances Changing States

by Curriculum Corporation - The Learning Federation initiative

This animation illustrates the processes by which substances change states. For example, from a solid to a gas via the process of sublimation. The role of temperature changes in these processes is also demonstrated.
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What is a Liquid?

by Janet Pinto

This animation shows the molecular arrangement and motion of liquid and gaseous bromine.
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Conservation of Mass

by Janet Pinto

This animation shows a chemical reaction between zinc and sulfur atoms to form zinc sulfide. The reactants and products are compared on two sides of a pan balance to illustrate that the total mass remains the same.
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Great interactive periodic table!
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An interactive to create a custom bar graph with your own data or display a bar graph from an included set of data.
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Create a Graph

by Janet Pinto

Enter data and labels to create five different types of graphs: bar, line, area, pie, xy. Can choose colors, fonts, sizes, shapes as well as print or save.
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Students will be introduced to the idea that water has a slight positive charge at one end of the molecule and a slight negative charge at the other (a polar molecule). Students view animations, make illustrations, and use their own water molecule models to develop an understanding of how the polar nature of water molecules can help explain some important characteristics of water. The electron cloud model shows where electrons are in a molecule.
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