Chapter 20: DNA Technology and Genomics contains external links to:

  • Recombinant DNA Technology Tutorial and Problem Set
  • Making Medicine Experiment
  • Karyotyping Activity
  • New Methods for Karyotyping
  • Sequence Yourself (Interactive Animation)
  • Explore a Stretch of Code (Interactive Animation)

This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.

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In this problem set, you will learn about some of the basic techniques of recombinant DNA, and how recombinant DNA technology is applied to human health. Instructions: The following problems have multiple choice answers. Correct answers are reinforced with a brief explanation. Incorrect answers are linked to tutorials to help solve the problem. 1. PCR primers 2. Recombinant DNA 1 3. Southern technique 4. Recombinant DNA 2 5. Recombinant DNA 3 6. Applications 7. Huntington's disease 1 8. Huntington's disease 9. Recombinant DNA 4 10. Recombinant DNA 5 11. Identifying recombinants This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.
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In this lab, you will learn how to spool strawberry DNA at home. This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.
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Karyotyping Activity

by Alison Loomis

This exercise is a simulation of human karyotyping using digital images of chromosomes from actual human genetic studies. You will be arranging chromosomes into a completed karyotype, and interpreting your findings just as if you were working in a genetic analysis program at a hospital or clinic. Karyotype analyses are performed over 400,000 times per year in the U.S. and Canada. Imagine that you were performing these analyses for real people, and that your conclusions would drastically affect their lives. This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.
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This resource links to a site where you can learn about an exciting new technique for diagnosing chromosomal abnormalities. This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.
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"Sequence for Yourself" should give you a good idea on how to sequence the human genome. In other words, this animated activity will teach you how to determine the sequence of A's, G's, C's, and T's that comprise the genome. This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.
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When scientists look at our genetic code, they can see an amazing story of human history and our connectedness to other creatures on this planet. They see long strings of code that are almost identical to the code in baker's yeast. They see the differences -- sometimes no more than a single letter -- that can mean the difference between health and disease. They see genetic code that has no known function but has repeatedly copied itself and hitchhiked across the human genome. They see densely populated regions, where genes are bunched up together, and vast deserts, with no meaningful code in sight. Here, explore an actual stretch of human DNA and see what the experts see. This resource is part of the Biology Links for One Laptop Per Child course which contains units on Exploring Life; The Cell; Genetics; Mechanisms of Evolution; The Evolutionary History of Biological Diversity; Plant Form and Function; Animal Form and Function; Ecology; and Astrobiology.
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