American History Collection new 2017

Collection Contents


These videos have been gathered from a variety of resources to compliment other collections of WWII history.
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Mission US is a multimedia project featuring free interactive adventure games set in different eras of U.S. history. The first game, Mission 1: "For Crown or Colony?," puts the player in the shoes of Nat Wheeler, a 14-year-old printer's apprentice in 1770 Boston. As Nat navigates the city and completes tasks, he encounters a spectrum of people living and working there when tensions mount before the Boston Massacre. Ultimately, the player determines Nat's fate by deciding where his loyalties lie. he creators of “For Crown or Colony?” have designed the game and accompanying classroom materials for educators and students to use in a variety of ways. The game’s flexible format allows for use in the classroom, at home, in the library or media center, or anywhere there’s a computer with an Internet connection. The game can be played in a one-computer classroom, a multiple-computer classroom, or in a lab setting. Students playing the game can work alone, in pairs, or in groups. Educators using the game can decide just how much classroom time they wish to dedicate to gameplay, in-class activities, and accompanying assignments. Your students will gain the most from “For Crown or Colony?” if their gameplay experiences are supported by classroom activities, discussions, and writing exercises guided by your teaching expertise. The “For Crown or Colony?” curriculum available on the Mission US website provides a wealth of materials to connect the game to your own goals and objectives related to teaching the American Revolution. This page provides you with some planning questions to help you map out your classroom implementation of “For Crown or Colony?” as well as three different “models” for low, medium, and high utilization of the game and the accompanying materials. http://www.mission-us.org/pages/mission-1
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Knowing Native Americans

by Melissa Webber

This unit will introduce students to Native Americans. It will provide an overview of various Native American groups in different geographical locations across America. The unit will progress into an in-depth study of the Wampanoag Indian Tribe, including an examination of daily family life and how the tribe met their basic needs. Furthermore, the unit will cover the Wampanoag’s role in helping the Pilgrims and celebrating the first Thanksgiving. Students will understand that different Native American groups lived in different parts of the country, becoming familiar with their ways of life and family structure. Students will also learn how Native Americans met their basic needs (food, clothing, shelter) with hunting, growing crops, and building. In addition, students will understand contributions that the Native Americans made to our country. Finally, students will gain an appreciation for cultures other than their own. Lessons include: Lesson #1: What do we Know About Native Americans? Lesson #2: Native Americans Migrate from Asia Lesson #3: Regions of North America Lesson #4: Pacific Northwest Native American Nations Lesson #5: Great Basin Native American Nation Lesson #6: Southwest Native American Nation Lesson #7: Plains Native American Nation Lesson #8: Eastern Woodlands Native American Nation Lesson #9: The Life of a Wampanoag Family Lesson #10: The First Thanksgiving I Lesson #11: The First Thanksgiving II Lesson #12: Final Review and Assessment Unit Resources include: Vocabulary Cards KWL Chart Native American Migration Map of Native American Nations Book of Native American Nations Pacific Northwest Nation Great Basin Nation Southwest Nation Plains Nation Eastern Woodlands Nation I am a Wampanoag Child Thanksgiving Venn Diagram Final Assessment Background Information for Teachers
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This is a collection of resources that support teaching and learning about the US Supreme Court.
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This collection of Open Educational Resources (OERs) has been curated by Curriki for all educators, parents, and students of history. It includes resources that span the scope and sequence of an American History course at the high school level.  Each unit includes primary source documents, digital history files, GIS resources, audio and visual resources, and sites that include lesson plans ranging from America's conception to modern day.      Each resource has been selected for its value to understanding major topics in the discovery, development and growth of the United States. Students will be called upon to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information from primary and secondary sources.  Use these units as a basis for your own US History curriculum or to supplement your existing curriculum. We are confident that you will find exciting new ways to help students make connections between events different time periods. Unit 1: Colonial AmericaExploration and settlement in colonial America -Shaping of American society in different regions -Discovery-1760sUnit 2: American RevolutionThe road to declaring independence -American Revolution -Formation of a new nation -1760s-1800Unit 3: American Expansion and SectionalismThe new nation's political frameworks -Westward expansion -Growing sectionalism -Precursors to the Civil WarUnit 4: Civil WarCivil War in America (1861-1865)Unit 5: ReconstructionReconstruction following American Civil War -1865-1877Unit 6: New FrontiersFollowing American Reconstruction, this unit focuses on topics including industrialization and the Gilded Age, urbanization, and progressivism -1880-1920Unit 7: Isolationist to World PowerThis unit focuses on the shift from American isolationism to involvement in World War I and subsequent status as a world power -1910sUnit 8: Roaring 20s, Great Depression, New DealThis unit explores the 1920s and 1930s, as America experiences a booming economic period following the First World War, transitions into an economic depression, and attempts to alleviate the crisis through the implementation of the New Deal -1920s-1930sUnit 9: World War IIUS involvement in WWII -1939-1945Unit 10: Turbulent DecadesExploration of the years following World War II, including topics such as the Civil Rights Movement, Cold War, Vietnam, Korean War, Cuban Missile Crisis -1950s-1970sUnit 11: Modern America Contemporary issues in politics, economics, and popular culture -1980s-present day
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Lessons and activities curated into this collection focus on helping students grasp the complex responsibilities and roles of the Executive Branch of the US Government. Includes resources on the Inauguration.
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Collection of high school activities from ABMC Education on critical understanding of issues of World War II.
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American Civil War

by Jorrie Brandhagen

During this unit students will learn the causes of the Civil War, influential people during the Civil War, battles, the cultural differences between the North and the South, economic differences of the North and the South, the Reconstruction Era and other important information of the time period of the Civil War. This unit has been created for the use in fifth grade, but can easily be modified for other ages.
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Civil War Resources

by Abigail Myers

Resources related to the Civil War.
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Chapter 2, Civil War

by Kathleen Duhl

The Love of Liberty video series focusing on African Americans in the Civil War.
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Music of the Civil War

by Brad GNABand

This PowerPoint describes the importance or music during the American Civil War.
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