All About the Supreme Court

This is a collection of resources that support teaching and learning about the US Supreme Court.

Craig Benzine talks about what happens when a case makes it to the Supreme Court of the United States (or the SCOTUS). We're going to focus on court procedure today. We talk about how to petition to get your case heard, how written arguments, or briefs, are made, what actually happens on the courtroom floor, and of course the variety of ways the SCOTUS issues opinions on cases.

 

There are two basic ways of approaching reading the Constitution; strict and loose. Both are given props in this video, so whoever your favorite founding father peeps are, something in here should give you a smile. Of course some might make you mad, but understanding different perspectives in the key to understanding the kingdom.

Link to the Supreme Court website: https://www.supremecourt.gov/

Biographies of Current Justices: https://www.supremecourt.gov/about/biographies.aspx

Timeline of Supreme Court Developments: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/timeline/index.html

Interactive Game: Talking About My Constitution: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/capitalism/constitution.html

Interactive Game: Supreme Court Concentration: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/educators/concentration.html

Classroom Interactive: A Day in the Life: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/educators/adayinthelife.html

Sandra Day O'Connor, First Woman of the Supreme Court: https://www.supremecourt.gov/visiting/sandradayoconnor.aspx

10 Ways to Study the Supreme Court with the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/learning/issues_in_depth/10SupremeCourtIdeas.html

 

 

 

 

 

Collection Contents

Supreme Court Quiz

by Janet Pinto

Supreme Court Quiz
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Supreme Court Quiz

by Janet Pinto

Quiz about the Supreme Court
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Supreme Court Activity In this activity, students do a simulation of a Supreme Court deliberation that introduces them to the difficult role of the courts balancing individual rights and public safety when national security is threatened. http://www.uscourts.gov/educational-resources/educational-activities/supreme-court-activity
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The Challenge of Selecting an Ideal Supreme Court Nominee Government Lesson Plan By Cathy Ruffing, Centreville High School, for the Supreme Court Summer Institute for Teachers Developed for the Supreme Court Summer Institute for Teachers, sponsored by the Supreme Court Historical Society and Street Law, Inc.    
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Lesson from iCivics: Supreme Court Nominations This lesson teaches the fundamentals of Supreme Court Justice nominations and helps students understand the politics behind the nominations; challenges students to cut through the politics and compare nominees’ judicial philosophies; includes an optional extension for students to research and analyze the controversial nominations and confirmation processes of Robert Bork, Harriet Miers, Clarence Thomas, and Merrick Garland.
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Students will be able to understand and identify the structure of the U.S. Government and law making systems. Students will also have some knowledge of how other systems of Government are run outside of the United States. Students will also have discussed the U.S. Constitution and its origins.
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I edited Nadirah's lesson plan on the Supreme Court. I thought her lesson was very interesting and engaging but her actual lesson plan could have used some fixing up. I also made her lesson a little less complicated and gave a lot more detail so I would not waste time during the actual class time. I also added adaptations for certain students. Students will discuss and analyze an important Supreme Case. Students will then debate a particular side of the case to assess the particular rights of the citizens in the United States. Determining our rights as citizens as well as what role we can play as citizens is important in order to be an active participating member of society.
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Students will investigate the backgrounds of the members of the U.S. Supreme Court. They will also interview adults to determine their knowledge of the Court.
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Four cases and questions to help students understand how the Supreme Court uses the Balancing Test to decide constitutional law issues. Some cases are real (Tinker v. Des Moines) and some are hypothetical.
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Supreme Court Cases

by Christen Downing

Lesson plan that delves into the significance and outcomes of major Supreme Court cases and how they affect society as a whole.
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