Group Size: Any

Time Required: 60 - 90 minutes

Learning Objective: Students will be able to identify details that support a central idea

Materials:

Student Worksheet (attached)
Printouts of the following articles for student use:

The Golden Gate Bridge was Completed and Opened
The Stock Market Fell to its Lowest Point During the Great Depression

Overhead transparencies of both articles 
Overhead transparency and additional paper copies of Graphic Organizer (attached)
Sticky Notes for coding the text

Do Now: (Students (S) will begin by completing the Do Now, which requires them to combine sentences, a high-yield strategy for improving student writing. The teacher (T) can then pair/share or whole-class share student responses. There are many possible correct responses.)

Connection: T will say: Yesterday we read about the Great Depression as we reviewed topic and central idea. Today we'll take it one step further and identify details that support a central idea.

Direct Instruction / Guided Practice: (T will begin by solicit students' prior knowledge about the terms "topic" and "central idea." T will write student input on the board.  Target:  Topic is what the passage is mostly about, and it can usually be stated in a few words.  Central idea is what the author is trying to tell you about the topic, and it is usually helpful to state it in a complete sentence.)

(T will solicit students' prior knowledge about the word "Details."  T will write student input on the board.)

For our purposes, we're going to say that details give us specific informationa bout the central idea.  They can be examples, reasons, facts, descriptions, steps or procedures.  

So we start with a fairly broad topic, what the passage is mostly about.  We then identify the central idea, which is more specific and captures what the author is trying to tell us about the central idea.  And finally, we identify details, which tell us even more specific information about the central idea.

(T will write the following on the board and instruct students to copy it into their notes.)

Details tell us specific information about the central idea
*** They can be examples, reasons, facts, descriptions, steps or procedures 

We're going to practice identify details in articles with which we're already familiar.  Yesterday, we read an article entitled "The Golden Gate Bridge was Completed and Opened."  I want you to take a moment to re-read that article once more so that you're ready to discuss it.  As you are reading, think once more about the topic and central idea, but also see if you can identify some details that will tell us more about the central idea.  (T will allow time.)

(T will place the overhead transparency on the projector.)

We'll be using this graphic organizer to help us think about topic, central idea, and details.  Who can remind me what the topic of the article was?  We discussed this yesterday?  (T will solicit topic from S, write topic in the "topic" box on the transparency, and instruct students to do the same on today's notes.  T will do the same for the central idea.)

Now that we've once again reviewed the article, help me to identify some details that tell us more about the central idea.  (Solicit students' ideas, and be sure to ask students to explain their thinking and to dispel misconceptions.  Complete the graphic organizer on the overhead transparency as S complete it at their seats.

Let's move on to the article entitled, "The Stock Market Fell to its Lowest Point During the Great Depression." You should re-read it silently and identify the topic, central idea, and details on your own.

(T will circulate to identify and support struggling students.  T will then facilitate a pair/share.)

Link: If you are reading a non-fiction selection for your literature circle group, you should extend your practice into your independent reading period by trying to identify the topic, central idea and details in each chapter.  I have copied some extra graphic organizers for your use, and they will be at the front of the classroom should you need them.

If you are reading a fiction selection, however, you will probably be best-served instead by coding the text with our sticky notes as you read.

Independent Practice: (S will read silently and code the text or identify topic, central idea and details.

Since all S should have selected literature circle novels and scheduled meetings with their literature circle groups for this week, small groups of students may be holding their meetings at this time.

T will either hold individual conferences with students to monitor progress and to support individual goal-setting or pull small groups for guided reading / other interventions.  

If T noticed particular students struggling to identify details in "The Stock Market...Great Depression," (s)he may wish to pull those students into a small group and provide additional scaffolding using extra graphic organizers and another topical article.  This article about Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary is both timely and high-interest.

Share: Our time for today is up. Please feel free to turn to your table partner or take a short walk to meet with your literature circle group so that you can share your work for today. Go over the observations you made as you read, and critique each others' thinking.

(T should allow time and circulate to check for understanding.)

Closing: Remember, the topic is what the passage is mostly about. It can be stated in just a few words. The central idea is something more specific. It's what the author is trying to tell you about the topic.  The details give us even more specific information about the central idea. 

It's time for million dollar question!

1. What are details?

2. Describe a text-to-self connection you recently made with your literature circle book.

3. Note to the Instructor: Insert a question here that spirals learning from previous units.

4. Explain the relationship between the "topic" and the "central idea."

Differentiation:

Gradual release and pair/share during Introduction to New Material/Guided Practice
Graphic organizer
Literature circle novels are differentiated by reading level and by choice
Opportunity for small-group work during Independent Practice
One-on-one Reader's Workshop conference to support individual students and to encourage individual goal-setting
Active reading strategy: coding the text

 

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