This collection includes units created by the 2010 Curriki Summer of Content award winners.

Collection Contents

Animath-e-Magic

by Amudha Nagarajan

This content was designed with Indian standards for children of age group 8 to 10. It covers the topics in grade 4 and 5. 1) Place value (Indian system), 2) Multiples and Factors, 3) Ascending and Descending Order of Numbers, 4) Number line and Jumping of Numbers. Each lesson has animated video tutorials followed by teacher student conversation, interactive activities and exercises.
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This unit focuses on spiraling concepts of the atom, the electromagnetic spectrum, energy, material properties and nanotechnology. All lab activities are student-centered inquiry labs which are open-ended. The unit also includes two POGIL activities, which should be completed within student groups of 3-4 students.
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Environment Webquest (FOLDER)

by Michelle vanGinneken (UofR)

This folder contains, the web link to the original WebQuest, a curriki version of the WebQuest, and a teacher resource file to help facilitate this WebQuest. This WebQuest was designed around the “Ecosystems” unit in the Saskatchewan Science 10 curriculum. It focuses on sustainability within ecosystems and how we, as individuals and as a community, affect sustainability with our choices and actions.
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Biomes of the World

by Micki Halsey Randall

In this four-week unit, students explore biomes around the world and investigate further a specific biome and country within the biome they choose. The unit includes discovery activities to understand human population trends and statistics, natural resources and how they are used, common diseases and natural disasters in specific regions of the world, thermodynamics and home construction in different parts of the world, and biome characteristics. The culminating activity is a biome showcase; an opportunity for the students to present their work to adults and students in the class.
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A Home for the Season

by Micki Halsey Randall

Using home construction as the context, students explore the processes of thermodynamics and energy efficiency. Each student will choose a region of the USA and a season (summer or winter) and design an energy efficient home. Through the course of designing their homes, students investigate the forms of heat transfer in homes, energy efficient strategies available to reduce heat transfer, and the differences in climate within our country.
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How Do We Progress?

by Alexandria Lau

Students will analyze what it means to pursue progress by studying the core values, events and people in the United States starting from the Progressive Movement through the modern era. This series is divided into three units. 1. How do we pursue social progress? 2. How do we pursue political progress? 3. How do we pursue economic progress? At the end of this unit, students will be able to identify the social, political, economic reforms initiated by Progressive reformers and examine how well their efforts were sustained by future reformers. All activities are inquiry based because it is my philosophy that students are most engaged when they are curious about the subject they are learning.
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Census 2010

by Judy Scharf

This unit will teach the student what the census is about and why it is necessary. Students will take a sample census, process the results, and use Microsoft Excel to prepare pie charts. They will present the results to their classmates in an oral presentation. Materials are organized into two folders, Teachers and Students. The Teacher folder includes lesson plans, useful links, and sample finished pie charts to be used as models. The Students folder includes handouts and unfinished templates to prepare pie charts.
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These games are meant to supplement a standard Pre-Algebra curriculum. There are two games per unit and vary from bingo to a scavenger hunt. The games follow the typical sequence of a 7th/8th grade Pre-Algebra course. The major concepts covered will be integers, equations, factors and fractions, rational numbers, ratios, proportions, percents, inequalities, functions, graphing, right triangles, and two-dimensional figures. The games are to be used in conjunction with a standard Pre-Algebra curriculum.
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The projects are meant to connect the world of math to that of art. They allow students to make connections that would not normally occur while completing problem sets. These projects follow the typical sequence of a 7th/8th grade Pre-Algebra course. The major concepts covered will be integers, equations, factors and fractions, rational numbers, ratios, proportions, percents, inequalities, functions, graphing, right triangles, and two-dimensional figures. These projects are to be used in conjunction with a standard Pre-Algebra curriculum.
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This Waves, Sound, and Light unit will help students understand the world around them through inquiry and hands-on experimentation. The major concepts covered will be waveforms, measures of a wave, interference, reflection, standing waves, refraction, diffraction, Doppler shift, bow/shock waves, sound transmission, wave speed, loudness and pitch, resonance, beats, electromagnetic spectrum, speed of light, luminous bodies, transparent materials, color, pigments, shadows, polarization, mirrors, images, lenses, and the eyeball. The unit takes 5-6 weeks, averaging 45 minutes a day if meeting 5 days/week. The unit is stand alone and/or could be used to accompany a number of texts.
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Students will develop an understanding of what light and color, and what it is not, and how it allows our sense of vision to be remarkably useful.
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This collection consists of two units that use "Sims" families (i.e. virtual families created by students) to engage middle-schoolers in various aspects of the Pre-Algebra curriculum. It uses a problem based learning design and centers around a Sims family that students progressively create (through Internet research) and use to solve various real-life problems pertaining to family life. Examples of such problems include: creating a family budget, filing taxes, planning and budgeting for a family road trip, etc. This collection consists of two instructional units which can be used either as complete curricula for their corresponding Pre-Algebra objectives or as supplements to the required curriculum. As a teacher, I have found this to be most rewarding when used as an extension and practical application of the curriculum I'm teaching.
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This unit will take approximately 3-4 weeks to complete.This unit was created to give students a hands-on experience when learning and exploring data analysis. About the Unit: Problem solving in an important focal point in the mathematics curriculum. Students can learn problem-solving strategies by working and learning with their peers, as well as becoming engaged in meaningful discourse in small and large group experiences. Getting students to attempt different processes and strategies to solve problems with increase their problem solving skills. Links to research: Uslick & Barr (2001) state: “children learn best by doing activities that they enjoy” (p. 392). In this unit, students will be given several opportunities to collect, represent, and analyze data. It is important that students experience how statistics are produced, the different ways they are displayed, and what kind of information can be understood from analyzing graphs, such as single and double bar graphs. Capraro et al. (2005) affirm that “students should have many experiences in making data tables and graphs, as well as using them to describe a variety of patterns and relationships” (p. 165). Graphing is visual way of presenting information. An excellent way of explaining the use and importance of graphs is verified by Capraro et al. (2005): “The purposes for graphing lie in the conveyance of numerical data in a visual form…and in conveying to the reader the patterns and/or irregularities present in the data that may or not be evident in the table form" (p. 165). One goal for this unit is for students to understand double bar graphs, its purpose and use, as well as to determine when a double bar graph is best utilized. Capraro et al. explain that “One of the most important decisions for students to make in the construction of a graph is determining which visual method should be used to answer the question presented” (p. 165). By providing the students with multiple experiences and examples of when to use and not to use double bar graphs then they will grasp a better understanding of the model and be able to apply their learning when given a problem to represent data that compares two variables (e.g. boys versus girls). Capraro et al. describe how students will choose a graph to display specific data without knowing the rationale behind the graph or how the audience with perceive graph. “Most students constructed the graph that was most familiar to them or their favorite, with little notion of its use or interpretability for the task at hand” (p. 169).
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This unit is designed to introduce middle school students to Powerpoint. This unit teaches them how to make their own Powerpoint presentation in order to conduct a student led parent/teacher conference. It is designed to be taught twice a week for 45 minutes sessions. However, the design of the unit is extremely flexible and can be adapted to fit your own needs.
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